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[Anaesthetic management for hemihepatectomy in a patient with carcinoid-syndrome].

Carcinoids are rare tumors of enterochromaffin cells. The carcinoid-syndrome most often occurs with hepatic metastases of carcinoids and is evoked by release of serotonin and other vasoactive substances, leading to typical symptoms such as hyper- or hypotension, bronchospasm, tachycardia, diarrhoe, and flushing. A lethal perioperative "carcinoid-crisis" may occur. We report on a patient with carcinoid-syndrome due to liver metastases undergoing hemihepatectomy. For prophylaxis, the patient preoperatively received H 1- and H 2-histamine-receptor antagonists, corticosteroids, and a continuous somatostatin infusion. Besides monitoring cardiovascular variables we intermittently measured serotonin- and catecholamine concentrations. Initially increased serotonin concentration decreased during the course of anaesthesia. However, it increased again during liver resection despite Pringle's manoeuvre and was associated with a decrease in arterial pressure, systemic vascular resistance, and central venous pressure. Hypotension was treated by volume and noradrenaline infusion. Thus, despite somatostatin infusion serotonin release is still possible, especially during surgical manipulation.

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