CLINICAL TRIAL
JOURNAL ARTICLE
MULTICENTER STUDY
RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL
RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Modafinil as adjunct therapy for daytime sleepiness in obstructive sleep apnea.

Patients with obstructive sleep apnea/hypopnea syndrome can experience residual daytime sleepiness despite regular use of nasal continuous positive airway pressure therapy. This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel group study assessed the efficacy and safety of modafinil for the treatment of residual daytime sleepiness in such patients. Patients received modafinil (n = 77) (200 mg/d, Week 1; 400 mg/d, Weeks 2 to 4) or matching placebo (n = 80) once daily for 4 wk. Modafinil significantly improved daytime sleepiness, with significantly greater mean changes from baseline in Epworth Sleepiness Scale scores at Weeks 1 and 4 (p < 0.001) and in multiple sleep latency times (MSLT) at Week 4 (p < 0.05). The percentage of patients with normalized daytime sleepiness (Epworth score < 10) was significantly higher with modafinil (51%) than with placebo (27%) (p < 0.01), but not for MSLT (> 10 min; 29% versus 25%). Headache (modafinil, 23%; placebo, 11%; p = 0.044) and nervousness (modafinil, 12%; placebo, 3%; p = 0.024) were the most common adverse events. During modafinil or placebo treatment, the mean duration of nCPAP use was 6.2 h/night, with no significant change from baseline observed between groups. Modafinil may be a useful adjunct treatment for the management of residual daytime sleepiness in patients with obstructive sleep apnea/hypopnea syndrome who are regular users of nasal continuous positive airway pressure therapy.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app