Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
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Progress toward analysis of D8/17 binding to B cells in children with obsessive compulsive disorder and/or chronic tic disorder.

BACKGROUND: Previous research has suggested that a subgroup of children with obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) have neuropsychiatric sequelae of streptococcal pharyngitis, similar to that seen in the neurological manifestation of rheumatic fever (RF). Monoclonal antibody D8/17 demonstrates increased binding to B cells in patients with RF and in patients with neuropsychiatric disorders using immunofluorescent microscopy.

OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to determine if an earlier immunofluorescent microscopy study of monoclonal antibody D8/17 in childhood-onset OCD and/or chronic tic disorder (CTD) could be replicated using the more objective method of flow cytometric analysis.

METHOD: D8/17 binding to B cells was determined in patients with OCD and or CTD (N=32), and healthy controls (N=12) by flow cytometric analysis.

RESULTS: Subjects with OCD/CTD showed increased mean cell binding (26.0%) of monoclonal antibody compared with healthy controls (9.1%) (p<0.001). When using the threshold of greater than 19% binding (95% upper confidence interval) as a measure of positivity, 65.6% of patients compared with 8.3% of controls showed increased antibody binding to B cells (p=0.01).

CONCLUSIONS: Although this study reports positive results, many methodological issues will need to be addressed before generalized use of assay for diagnostic purposes.

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