Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
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Alcohol use and workplace aggression: an examination of perpetration and victimization.

PURPOSE: The purpose of the present investigation was to examine the relationship between victimization from and perpetration of workplace aggression between coworkers and frequency of alcohol use during the last year.

METHODS: Civilian employees (N = 300) selected from the US population were interviewed over the telephone with psychometrically sound measures of workplace aggression and alcohol use frequency during the last year. Hierarchical regression analyses were used to examine the relationship between alcohol use and workplace aggression, after controlling for sociodemographic variables.

RESULTS: Both percentage of days of any drinking and percentage of days of heavy drinking during the last year were positively related to (a) victimization from verbal and physical aggression at work and (b) perpetration of verbal and physical aggression at work.

IMPLICATIONS: Consistent with research studies spanning the sociobehavioral literature, the present investigation found alcohol use was associated with perpetration of and victimization from verbal and physical workplace aggression. Although the study established an association exists between alcohol use and workplace aggression, future investigations should attempt to understand employee alcohol use in the context of a multifaceted model that includes other likely factors that contribute to the incidence of aggressive behavior on the job.

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