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Effect of exercise training and detraining on bone mineral density in postmenopausal women with osteoporosis.

We examined the effect of exercise training and detraining on bone mineral density (BMD) in postmenopausal women with osteoporosis. Thirty-five postmenopausal women with osteoporosis, aged 53-77 years, were randomly assigned to three groups: a control group (n = 20), a 2-year exercise training group (n = 8), and an 1-year exercise training plus 1-year detraining group (n = 7). Exercise training consisted of daily brisk walking and gymnastic training. Calcium lactate, 2.0 g, and 1alpha-hydroxyvitamin D3, 1 microg were supplied daily to all subjects. No significant differences in initial lumbar BMD, measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) were found among the three groups. The mean percent change in BMD compared with the baseline was significantly higher at 1 and 2 years in the exercise training group and at 1 year in the detraining group than in the control group, and did not differ significantly at 2 years between the detraining and control groups. These findings indicate that our exercise training program led to a significant increase in lumbar BMD in postmenopausal women with osteoporosis compared with the control, but that the BMD reverted toward a level that was not significantly different from the control with detraining. Continued exercise training is needed to maintain the bone mass gained through exercise training.

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