Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

The relationship between craniofacial morphology and obstructive sleep apnea in whites and in African-Americans.

Previous studies of craniofacial risk factors for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) have been based predominantly on cephalometry. However, differences in head form (measured by the cranial index [CI]) and facial form (measured by the facial index [FI]) are considered by anthropologists to provide a basis for structural variation in craniofacial anatomy. We assessed the association of head and facial form with the apnea hypopnea index (AHI) in 364 white individuals and 165 African-Americans. Data collected included cranial and facial dimensions (using anthropometric calipers), body mass index (BMI), neck circumference, and the AHI. CI and FI differed for whites with OSA (AHI > or = 15) versus those without OSA (AHI < 5) (increased CI and decreased FI in subjects with OSA, p = 0.005 and p = 0.006, respectively). CI and FI did not differ in OSA versus non-OSA groups of African-Americans. In subjects with OSA, the CI in whites was again greater and the FI smaller than those in African-Americans (p = 0.007 and p = 0.004, for CI and FI.) We conclude that brachycephaly is associated with an increased AHI in whites but not in African-Americans. The CI may useful in phenotyping and identifying population subsets with OSA.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

Related Resources

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app