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Six cases of confluent and reticulated papillomatosis alleviated by various antibiotics.

Confluent and reticulated papillomatosis (CRP) is a relatively rare disorder manifested by persistent papules that are confluent in the center and reticulated at the periphery with a characteristic distribution. Recently, many cases of CRP treated with minocycline have been reported, and their effect seems to be derived from their antibiotic properties. We report 6 cases of CRP alleviated by various antibiotics. The patient described in case 1 is a 16-year-old girl whose disease was alleviated by oral minocycline, 100 mg daily for 8 weeks. Cases 2 and 3 describe an 18-year-old woman and a 17-year-old male adolescent whose disease was reduced by oral fusidic acid, 1000 mg daily for 4 weeks. Case 4 describes a 14-year-old girl who received oral clarithromycin, 500 mg daily for 5 weeks. Case 5 describes a 22-year-old woman whose disease was reduced by oral erythromycin, 1000 mg daily for 6 weeks. Case 5 reports a 24-year-old man who received oral azithromycin, 500 mg daily 3 times per week for 3 weeks. Complete clearing after treatment with antibiotics raises the possibility that CRP is triggered by a bacterial infection and that antibiotics are the treatment of choice for CRP.

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