JOURNAL ARTICLE
REVIEW
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Peripheral blood stem cells for allogeneic transplantation: a review.

Peripheral blood stem cells (PBSCs) have become increasingly popular for use in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. PBSCs are readily collected by continuous-flow apheresis from patients and healthy donors after the administration of s.c. recombinant colony-stimulating factors with only minimal morbidity and discomfort. Although the precise identification of PBSCs remains elusive, they can be phenotypically identified as a subset of all circulating CD34(+) cells. There are important phenotypic and biologic distinctions between PBSCs and bone marrow (BM)-derived progenitor cells. PBSCs express more lineage-specific antigens but are less metabolically active than their BM-derived counterparts. The use of PBSCs for allogeneic transplantation has been compared to BM in several randomized trials and cohort studies. The use of PBSCs in leukemia, myeloma, non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, and myelodysplasia has resulted in shorter times to neutrophil and platelet engraftment at the expense of increased rates of chronic graft-versus-host disease. The increase in graft-versus-host disease is mainly due to a log-fold increase in donor T cells transferred with the graft. Relapse rates after transplantation may be lower after PBSC transplantation but a convincing survival advantage has not been demonstrated overall. It is possible that a stronger graft-versus-tumor effect may exist with PBSCs when compared with BM although the mechanisms leading to this effect are not clear.

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