JOURNAL ARTICLE
Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Anatomic reconstruction of the nasal tip cartilages in secondary and reconstructive rhinoplasty.

Most techniques for secondary rhinoplasty assume that useful residual remnants of the tip cartilages remain, but frequently the alar cartilages are missing--unilaterally, bilaterally, completely, or incompletely--with loss of the lateral crura, middle crura, and parts of the medial crura. In such severe cases, excision of scar tissue and the residual alar remnants and their replacement with nonanatomic tip grafts have been recommended. Multiple solid, bruised, or crushed cartilage fragments are positioned in a closed pocket or solid shield-shaped grafts are fixed with sutures during an open rhinoplasty. These onlay filler grafts only increase tip projection and definition. Associated tip abnormalities (alar rim notching, columellar retraction, nostril distortion) are not addressed. Problems with graft visibility, an unnatural appearance, or malposition have been noted. Fortunately, techniques useful in reconstructive rhinoplasty can be applied to severe cosmetic secondary deformities. Anatomic cartilage replacements similar in shape, bulk, and position to normal alar cartilages can be fashioned from septal, ear, and rib cartilage, fixed to the residual medial crura and/or a columellar strut, and bent backward to restore the normal skeletal framework of the tip. During an open rhinoplasty, a fabricated and rigid framework is designed to replace the missing medial, middle, or lateral crus of one or both alar cartilages. The entire alar tripod is recreated. These anatomic alar cartilage reconstructive grafts create tip definition and projection, fill the lobule and restore the expected lateral convexity, position the columella and establish columellar length, secure and position the alar rim, and brace the external valve against collapse, support the vestibular lining, and restore a nostril shape. The anatomic form and function of the nasal tip is restored. This technique is recommended when alar cartilages are significantly destroyed or absent in secondary or reconstructive rhinoplasty and the alar remnants are insufficient for repair. Anatomically designed alar cartilage replacements allow an aesthetically structured skeleton to contour the overlying skin envelope. Problems with displacement are minimized by graft fixation. Graft visibility is used to the surgeon's advantage. A rigidly supported framework with a nasal shape can mold a covering forehead flap or the scarred tip skin of a secondary rhinoplasty and create a result that may approach normal. Anatomic alar cartilage reconstructions were used in eight reconstructive and eight secondary rhinoplasties in the last 5 years. Their use in the repair of postrhinoplasty deformities is emphasized.

Full text links

Management of Latent Tuberculosis Infection.JAMA 2023 January 20
How I Treat Multiple myeloma in the geriatric patient.Blood 2023 January 25

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Group 7SearchHeart failure treatmentPapersTopicsCollectionsEffects of Sodium-Glucose Cotransporter 2 Inhibitors for the Treatment of Patients With Heart Failure Importance: Only 1 class of glucose-lowering agents-sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors-has been reported to decrease the risk of cardiovascular events primarily by reducingSeptember 1, 2017: JAMA CardiologyAssociations of albuminuria in patients with chronic heart failure: findings in the ALiskiren Observation of heart Failure Treatment study.CONCLUSIONS: Increased UACR is common in patients with heart failure, including non-diabetics. Urinary albumin creatininineJul, 2011: European Journal of Heart FailureRandomized Controlled TrialEffects of Liraglutide on Clinical Stability Among Patients With Advanced Heart Failure and Reduced Ejection Fraction: A Randomized Clinical Trial.Review

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Read by QxMD is copyright © 2021 QxMD Software Inc. All rights reserved. By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app