JOURNAL ARTICLE

Student satisfaction with a Website designed for three nursing courses

K Zwolski
CIN Plus 2000 January 1, 3 (1): 12, 6-7
10890841
The website described was not designed to replace classroom teaching, but to serve as an additional tool for students attending a traditional course. Based on my experience and the data obtained from the evaluation questionnaire, the following points can be made: students are enthusiastic about the Internet and will access a web page that accompanies a particular course or courses a website can allow for objectives, not normally engendered by traditional methods, to be achieved. These may include, for instance, fostering a sense of community, providing new means of communication between professor and student and serving as a portal to the vast resources of the Internet. A single-theme website can effectively address the learning needs of students at different levels, in this case both undergraduate and graduate students A well-designed website can increase the visibility of the educational institution that sponsors it It is not easy to measure a website's effectiveness in helping students achieve traditional course objectives or its impact on student learning. The questionnaire results confirm students' satisfaction with the website and their belief that it was an important and useful learning tool. This is significant and positive. Future research is needed to measure the degree to which a website can increase learning in a particular area. The site required about 150 hours to construct and about 6-8 hours per week to maintain. This is a considerable amount of faculty time. Although I cannot speak for others, I firmly believe that this is a worthwhile investment. The website is clearly appreciated by students, and it seems logical to conclude that it is fulfilling some learning needs that may not be met by other methods. In addition, it provides the educator with a new vehicle for communication. It is exhilarating to create with new formats and to use expertise in a given area to reach students, foster community, and establish a presence beyond the classroom. Creating and maintaining a web page is labor intensive, but it is, in my opinion, worth the effort. I strongly urge nurse educators to explore the possibilities of developing websites to accompany individual courses and to consider even more interactive web pages that include online discussion groups and provide space for posting student work. An active website needs frequent maintenance and updates. I recommend that academic administrators recognize web authoring as a valid and legitimate activity and provide nursing faculty with necessary support. This might include workshops on web authoring or Internet use, released time or credited time for initial website design, and credit allocation for site maintenance. The Internet is the most extensive collection of information available. As webmaster and pathophysiology expert, I am guiding my students; as a teacher, I am both assuming and recognizing a new role. As a teacher, I need to assume the responsibility for guiding students to worthwhile resources in the subject area. The website is a portal to the world, but a portal that I oversee.

Full Text Links

Find Full Text Links for this Article

Discussion

You are not logged in. Sign Up or Log In to join the discussion.

Trending Papers

Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read
10890841
×

Save your favorite articles in one place with a free QxMD account.

×

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"