JOURNAL ARTICLE
RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
REVIEW
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Liver transplantation for hereditary transthyretin amyloidosis.

Transthyretin (TTR) amyloidosis is the most common form of hereditary amyloidosis. It is a systemic amyloidosis caused by an amyloidogenic variant TTR (ATTR), of which the methionine for valine at position 30 (ATTR Val30Met) gives rise to a fatal neuropathic amyloidosis. Because more than 95% of TTR is produced by the liver, a liver transplantation should abolish the liver's production of amyloidogenic mutant TTR and thereby halt amyloid formation. The first liver transplantation for hereditary TTR amyloidosis was performed in Sweden in 1990 on a patient with ATTR Val30Met amyloidosis, and the result was encouraging. Today, liver transplantation for TTR amyloidosis is an established treatment. However, the disease is rarely seen except in a few endemic areas; therefore, most transplantation centers only receive a few cases. Because the disease phenotype varies with different TTR mutations and variability is even encountered for the same mutation, an evaluation of patients for transplantation must include an investigation of all organs that may be affected by the disease and may impact on the morbidity and mortality of the procedure. The aim of this review is to present the results of liver transplantation for TTR amyloidosis and give recommendations for patient evaluation and selection based on the literature and our experience with the disease.

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