CLINICAL TRIAL
COMPARATIVE STUDY
JOURNAL ARTICLE
RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL
Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

The prognostic implications of renal insufficiency in asymptomatic and symptomatic patients with left ventricular systolic dysfunction.

OBJECTIVES: The present analysis examines the prognostic implications of moderate renal insufficiency in patients with asymptomatic and symptomatic left ventricular systolic dysfunction.

BACKGROUND: Chronic elevations in intracardiac filling pressures may lead to progressive ventricular dilation and heart failure progression. The ability to maintain fluid balance and prevent increased intracardiac filling pressures is critically dependent on the adequacy of renal function.

METHODS: This is a retrospective analysis of the Studies of Left Ventricular Dysfunction (SOLVD) Trials, in which moderate renal insufficiency is defined as a baseline creatinine clearance <60 ml/min, as estimated from the Cockroft-Gault equation.

RESULTS: In the SOLVD Prevention Trial, multivariate analyses demonstrated moderate renal insufficiency to be associated with an increased risk for all-cause mortality (Relative Risk [RR] 1.41; p = 0.001), largely explained by an increased risk for pump-failure death (RR 1.68; p = 0.007) and the combined end point death or hospitalization for heart failure (RR 1.33; p = 0.001). Likewise, in the Treatment Trial, multivariate analyses demonstrated moderate renal insufficiency to be associated with an increased risk for all-cause mortality (RR 1.41; p = 0.001), also largely explained by an increased risk for pump-failure death (RR 1.49; p = 0.007) and the combined end point death or hospitalization for heart failure (RR 1.45; p = 0.001).

CONCLUSIONS: Even moderate degrees of renal insufficiency are independently associated with an increased risk for all-cause mortality in patients with heart failure, largely explained by an increased risk of heart failure progression. These data suggest that, rather than simply being a marker of the severity of underlying disease, the adequacy of renal function may be a primary determinant of compensation in patients with heart failure, and therapy capable of improving renal function may delay disease progression.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app