Comparative Study
Journal Article
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Comparison of patellar resurfacing versus nonresurfacing in total knee arthroplasty.

OBJECTIVES: To determine whether resurfacing the patellar component during total knee replacement (TKR) influences the clinical outcome.

DESIGN: A retrospective study of data gathered prospectively during the recovery course of patients who underwent TKR with or without patellar resurfacing.

SETTING: Victoria General Hospital, Halifax, NS.

PATIENTS: One hundred and eighty-five patients operated on between 1992 and 1995. The inclusion criteria were (a) osteoarthritis, (b) replacement carried out by 2 independent surgeons, (c) no comorbid illness such as rheumatoid arthritis, cancer or infection, (d) pre- and postoperative attendance at the assessment clinics.

INTERVENTION: TKR with (45) or without (140) patellar replacement.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Range of motion (ROM), pain assessment, Hospital Severity Score (HSS) and complications.

RESULTS: There was no statistical difference between the 2 groups with respect to ROM, pain, HSS and complications postoperatively.

CONCLUSIONS: Resurfacing the patella during TKR does not seem to influence the clinical outcome with respect to ROM, pain and overall complications. The decision should be based on individual criteria, depending on the preoperative and intraoperative findings. Randomized clinical trials assessing ROM, pain, complications and cost-effectiveness with long-term follow-up are necessary to further investigate this controversial issue.

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