Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
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CT assessment of cerebral perfusion: experimental validation and initial clinical experience.

Radiology 1999 October
PURPOSE: To validate a dynamic single-section computed tomographic (CT) method to measure cerebral blood volume (CBV) and cerebral blood flow (CBF) by using a noncarotid artery as the input and to demonstrate the feasibility of this method in a pilot series of patients.

MATERIALS AND METHODS: Twelve dynamic contrast material-enhanced CT studies were performed in beagles. CBV, CBF, and mean transit time (MTT) values were calculated by using an internal carotid artery (ICA) and a noncarotid artery as the input artery to the brain. Patient studies with use of the radial artery as the input were performed (a) repetitively in two patients after subarachnoid hemorrhage, (b) in a patient with a symptomatic ICA occlusion before and after the intravenous injection of 1 g of acetazolamide, and (c) in a patient with a malignant brain tumor.

RESULTS: Linear regression analyses revealed highly significant correlations (P < .001) between CBV (r, 0.98; slope, 0.96), CBF (r, 0.89; slope, 0.87), and MTT (r, 0.80; slope, 0.76) values calculated with the ICA and the noncarotid inputs. The CT-derived patient data correlated well with ancillary clinical and neuroradiologic findings.

CONCLUSION: Dynamic single-section CT scanning to measure CBV and CBF on the basis of a noncarotid input is a highly accessible and cost-effective blood flow measurement technique.

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