JOURNAL ARTICLE

Laser arytenoidectomy in the treatment of bilateral vocal cord paralysis

Z Szmeja, J G Wójtowicz
European Archives of Oto-rhino-laryngology 1999, 256 (8): 388-9
10525940
The introduction of the CO2 surgical laser into laryngeal microsurgery has made resection of the posterior vocal cord together with the arytenoid cartilage possible. Since November 1990, 30 arytenoidectomies, 17 partial cordectomies and 18 bilateral cordectomies as described by Kashima were performed by means of a CO(2) laser in patients with bilateral paralyses of the vocal cords. In this group there were 58 women and 7 men. The patients' ages ranged from 28 to 71 years (mean, 46.7 years). In one case the operation was performed twice: the right arytenoid cartilage was excised initially and the left arytenoid cartilage was removed in the second procedure. Three patients required tracheotomy before being transformed to the ENT Clinic, Poznañ. The etiologies of the vocal cord paralyses were complications arising from thyroid gland surgery (n = 62), trauma (n = 2) and excision of a bilateral glomus caroticum tumor. In all patients except one postoperative recovery was correct and no breathing difficulties were observed after extubation. In the one failure after operation endolaryngeal scar tissue resulted in glottic stenosis.

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