OPEN IN READ APP
COMPARATIVE STUDY
JOURNAL ARTICLE

Trauma faculty and trauma team activation: impact on trauma system function and patient outcome

S Khetarpal, B S Steinbrunn, M D McGonigal, R Stafford, A L Ney, D C Kalb, M A West, J L Rodriguez
Journal of Trauma 1999, 47 (3): 576-81
10498319

OBJECTIVE: To determine the impact of the presence of an attending trauma surgeon during trauma team activation on system function and patient outcome.

METHODS: After a retrospective review of medical records and trauma registry, a comparative study between two American College of Surgeons Committee on Trauma Level I trauma centers was performed. One center (Hennepin County Medical Center) required a chief surgical resident, two junior residents, and a board-certified emergency medicine faculty to be present in the emergency department for all trauma team activations. The attending trauma surgeon was notified at the time of trauma team activation and was neither required to be present in the emergency department at time of patient arrival nor in the hospital 24 h/day. The other center (St. Paul Ramsey Medical Center) required a chief surgical resident, two junior residents, a board-certified emergency medicine faculty member, and an attending trauma surgeon to be present in the emergency department for all trauma activations and in hospital 24 hours/day. Over a 21-month period, all major trauma patients (Injury Severity Score > 15 or emergent operation within 4 hours of admission and any Injury Severity Score) that triggered trauma team activation were examined. Resuscitation time, time to incision, probability of survival, and mortality were analyzed.

RESULTS: Resuscitation time was shorter at St. Paul Ramsey Medical Center when compared with Hennepin County Medical Center. Analysis by mechanism of injury demonstrates that this was true for blunt trauma (39+/-13 vs. 27+/-12 minutes, p = 0.001) and for penetrating trauma (28+/-14 vs. 24+/-17 minutes, p = 0.01). Subgroup analysis of penetrating trauma victims demonstrated that there was a significant difference in resuscitation times for gunshot wounds but not for stabs. There was no difference in how quickly operations could be initiated for blunt trauma patients. However, in penetrating cases, time to incision was significantly shorter at St. Paul Ramsey Medical Center (50+/-29 vs. 66+/-43 minutes, p = 0.01). There was no significant difference in mortality for any category of Trauma and Injury Severity Score probability of survival in blunt or penetrating trauma. Analysis of "in-house" and "out-house" time intervals demonstrated no difference in survival in any mechanism of injury, nor was there a difference in overall mortality.

CONCLUSION: The presence of a trauma surgeon on the trauma team reduced resuscitation time and reduced time to incision for emergent operations, particularly in penetrating trauma. However, it had no measurable impact on mortality based on Trauma and Injury Severity Score probability of survival. Attending trauma surgeon presence on the trauma team improves in-hospital trauma system function without affecting patient outcome.

Comments

You need to log in or sign up for an account to be able to comment.

No comments yet, be the first to post one!

Related Papers

Available on the App Store

Available on the Play Store
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read
10498319
×

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"