JOURNAL ARTICLE
RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
REVIEW
Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Cyclic vomiting syndrome: features to be explained by a pathophysiologic model.

Cyclic vomiting syndrome is a disorder of unknown etiology that is characterized by its clinical pattern of rapid-fire, episodic (on-off) vomiting with interval wellness. The pattern is stereotypic within individuals and typified by a rapid onset during the night or early morning, rapid denouement, and associated symptoms of pallor, lethargy, anorexia, nausea, retching, vomiting, and abdominal pain. The vomiting appears to be triggered by a variety of physical and psychological stresses. The disorder usually begins in toddlers and resolves during adolescence. By definition, cyclic vomiting syndrome is an idiopathic disorder that requires exclusionary laboratory testing. Not only can it be mimicked by many specific disorders, eg, surgical, neurologic, endocrine, metabolic, renal, but within idiopathic cyclic vomiting syndrome there may be specific subgroups that have different mechanisms. Treatment options are improving at present and serotonergic agents have the most promise. Although the pathogenesis is unknown, there are now several tenable mechanisms including migraine, metabolic, neuroendocrine, and gastrointestinal. Cyclic vomiting syndrome may be a useful model for the study of emesis.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app