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Bilateral lumbosacral plexopathy after mesenteric thrombosis.

Spinal Cord 1999 July
OBJECTIVE: A case of lumbosacral plexopathy (LSP) following operation for mesenteric thrombosis.

DESIGN: Case report of a 64-year-old man who developed weakness and numbness of the distal legs after an operation for mesenteric thrombosis.

SETTING: Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, University Hospital La Fe, Valencia, Spain.

SUBJECT: Single patient case report.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Clinical and electromyography follow-up of the patient between October 1996 and August 1997.

RESULTS: Physical examination revealed marked lower extremity weakness, hypotonia, hyporreflexia and normal bowel and bladder function. Electromyography demonstrated marked denervation of all major muscle groups, and sensory nerve conduction showed absence of responses in all peripheral nerves, in both legs.

CONCLUSION: To our knowledge, bilateral LSP following an intervention of mesenteric thrombosis, has never been reported in the literature. Diagnosis of LSP might be based on electromyography and nerve conduction studies that demonstrate electrodiagnostic criteria for LSP, including denervation in muscles innervated by at least two lumbosacral segmental levels and involving at least two different peripheral nerves, without paraspinal involvement.

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