CASE REPORTS
JOURNAL ARTICLE
RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
RESEARCH SUPPORT, U.S. GOV'T, P.H.S.
REVIEW
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Transient monosomy 7: a case series in children and review of the literature.

Cancer 1999 June 16
BACKGROUND: Monosomy 7 and deletions of the long arm of chromosome 7 [del (7q)] are recurrent, nonrandom chromosomal abnormalities associated with both de novo and therapy-related myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). The overall prognosis for children and adults with these chromosomal abnormalities is poor. In the current report, the authors present five children with MDS associated with monosomy 7/del(7q) who achieved spontaneous hematologic disease remission as well as a review of the literature.

METHODS: Five children with either de novo or treatment-related MDS who achieved spontaneous hematologic disease remission are presented. Relevant clinical, cytogenetic, and fluorescent in situ hybridization data are included.

RESULTS: All patients were boys. Three had de novo MDS whereas two others previously had received chemotherapy for another malignancy. Four patients achieved spontaneous and durable hematologic disease remission that was associated with cytogenetic disease remission in all three patients tested. The fifth patient developed a disease recurrence and died with evidence of clonal evolution after a long interval of hematologic and cytogenetic remission.

CONCLUSIONS: A subset of children who develop MDS associated with monosomy 7 or del(7q) achieve spontaneous hematologic and cytogenetic improvement. Although this appears to be uncommon, further data are needed to determine the percentage of patients who improve without therapy and to define clinical characteristics that may predict this clinical outcome. These findings suggest that monosomy 7/del(7q) is insufficient to produce full leukemic transformation.

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