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Journal of Graduate Medical Education

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https://read.qxmd.com/read/30619540/learning-how-to-care-for-grandma-and-grandpa
#1
EDITORIAL
Rachel Hart
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
December 2018: Journal of Graduate Medical Education
https://read.qxmd.com/read/30619539/caring-for-the-survivors-when-a-resident-or-fellow-dies
#2
EDITORIAL
Russell K McAllister, Maxine Trent
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
December 2018: Journal of Graduate Medical Education
https://read.qxmd.com/read/30619538/icre-top-research-papers
#3
(no author information available yet)
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
December 2018: Journal of Graduate Medical Education
https://read.qxmd.com/read/30619537/discharge-summary
#4
Bailey Fitzgerald
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
December 2018: Journal of Graduate Medical Education
https://read.qxmd.com/read/30619536/welcome-to-the-profession
#5
Grace Faith Chao
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
December 2018: Journal of Graduate Medical Education
https://read.qxmd.com/read/30619535/pseudo-probabilistic-aphorisms
#6
Paul A Bergl
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
December 2018: Journal of Graduate Medical Education
https://read.qxmd.com/read/30619534/graduate-medical-education-committee-meetings-101
#7
Ronald G Amedee, Donna Guidroz, William Tex Walker
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
December 2018: Journal of Graduate Medical Education
https://read.qxmd.com/read/30619533/i-catch-a-novel-bundle-to-improve-postcall-morning-handoffs
#8
Jonathan S Zipursky, Gousia Dhhar, Adina Weinerman, Lynfa Stroud, Brian M Wong
Background: Conducting postcall morning handoffs using a resident handoff bundle such as I-PASS can prove challenging. This may delay recognizing and acting on clinically important patient issues that arose overnight. Objective: We developed and implemented the I-CATCH morning handoff bundle and evaluated its impact on the proportion of overnight patient issues handed off from the on-call resident to the daytime team. Methods: We evaluated the I-CATCH ( I dentify patient; C haracterize situation; A ction-what was done overnight?; T o do for the team in the morning; C onfirm the H andoff) handoff bundle from November 2015 to May 2016 on general internal medicine wards at 1 academic teaching hospital...
December 2018: Journal of Graduate Medical Education
https://read.qxmd.com/read/30619532/improving-handoffs-implementing-a-training-program-for-incoming-internal-medicine-residents
#9
Erica Lescinskas, Diana Stewart, Chirayu Shah
Background: The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education Clinical Learning Environment Review program requires residents to receive training in handoffs, but there is limited information on best practices in implementing handoff training. Objective: We hypothesized that a bundled, standardized approach to handoffs during intern orientation would increase trainee comfort, confidence, and knowledge. Methods: All incoming internal medicine interns participated in a Care Transitions workshop during orientation that was divided into 3 sections: introduction and handoff videos using the I-PASS handoff tool, small group discussion of case scenarios, and a 1-on-1 handoff simulation with an evaluator...
December 2018: Journal of Graduate Medical Education
https://read.qxmd.com/read/30619531/long-term-outcomes-of-a-simulation-based-remediation-for-residents-and-faculty-with-unprofessional-behavior
#10
Jeannette Guerrasio, Eva M Aagaard
Background: There are few studies describing remediation for unprofessional behavior in residents and faculty and none that assess the long-term impact of remediation. Objective: We implemented a simulation-based personalized remediation program for unprofessional behavior in residents and faculty and collected assessments from participants and referring supervisors. Methods: Residents and faculty were referred for unprofessional behaviors, including aggressive, condescending, and argumentative communication styles as well as an inability to read social cues...
December 2018: Journal of Graduate Medical Education
https://read.qxmd.com/read/30619530/the-use-of-experiential-learning-modules-to-teach-integrative-medicine-approaches
#11
Candace M Gragnani, Iljie K Fitzgerald, Rashmi Mullur
Background: Complementary, alternative, and integrative medicine (CAIM) are considered important in shifting toward whole person care. Residents remain limited in their understanding of CAIM approaches, preventing effective utilization. Objective: We created modules to expose residents to available CAIM approaches in a Veterans Administration setting, using conceptual frameworks for experience-based learning. Methods: In June 2016, 38 internal medicine residents at the VA Greater Los Angeles Healthcare System were randomized to 45-minute small group sessions...
December 2018: Journal of Graduate Medical Education
https://read.qxmd.com/read/30619529/using-the-cler-pathways-to-excellence-to-evaluate-the-learning-environments-at-a-multi-site-institution
#12
Maria Aaron, Philip Shayne, Erica Brownfield, Nathan O Spell, Jaffar Khan, Ulemu Luhanga
Background: The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education Clinical Learning Environment Review (CLER) program visits 1 participating site per sponsoring institution. While valuable, feedback on that site does not necessarily generalize to all learning environments where trainees and faculty provide clinical care, and institutions may be missing significant insight and feedback on other clinical learning sites. Objective: We explored how the Emory Learning Environment Evaluation process-modeled after CLER-could be used to improve the learning environments at 5 major clinical training sites...
December 2018: Journal of Graduate Medical Education
https://read.qxmd.com/read/30619528/patient-safety-incentives-for-residents-a-slippery-slope-or-reinforcement-of-desirable-behavior
#13
Kathryn Rapala
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
December 2018: Journal of Graduate Medical Education
https://read.qxmd.com/read/30619527/incentives-can-drive-change-in-residents-patient-care
#14
Carol M Rumack
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
December 2018: Journal of Graduate Medical Education
https://read.qxmd.com/read/30619526/should-trainees-get-paid-to-submit-patient-safety-reports
#15
Rebecca L Volpe, Steve Mrozowski, Michael J Green
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
December 2018: Journal of Graduate Medical Education
https://read.qxmd.com/read/30619525/improving-resident-and-fellow-engagement-in-patient-safety-through-a-graduate-medical-education-incentive-program
#16
David A Turner, Jonathan Bae, George Cheely, Judy Milne, Thomas A Owens, Catherine M Kuhn
Background: Collaboration between graduate medical education (GME) and health systems is essential for the success of patient safety initiatives. One example is the development of an incentive program aligning trainee performance with health system quality and safety priorities. Objective: We aimed to improve trainee safety event reporting and engagement in patient safety through a GME incentive program. Methods: The incentive program was implemented to provide financial incentives to drive behavior and engage residents and fellows in safety efforts...
December 2018: Journal of Graduate Medical Education
https://read.qxmd.com/read/30619524/program-director-perceptions-of-subspecialty-tracking-in-obstetrics-and-gynecology-residency
#17
Eduardo Hariton, Taylor S Freret, Roni Nitecki, Emily Hinchcliff, Amy Stagg
Background: Residency programs have experienced a trend toward decreased work hours and case volumes, negatively affecting the perception of graduating residents' competence. Subspecialty tracks have been proposed to help address these issues. Objective: We evaluated the perceptions of obstetrics and gynecology (ob-gyn) residency program directors (PDs) on subspecialty tracking during training. Methods: In 2017, a web-based, anonymous survey with Likert scale and open-ended items was e-mailed to US ob-gyn PDs...
December 2018: Journal of Graduate Medical Education
https://read.qxmd.com/read/30619523/geriatrics-curriculum-needs-assessment-for-dermatology-residency-programs
#18
Justin Endo, Adam Awe, Shalini T Reddy, Laura E Hirshfield, Carol Kamin, Matthew Lineberry
Background: Geriatric patients account for a growing proportion of dermatology clinic visits. Although their biopsychosocial needs differ from those of younger adults, there are no geriatrics training requirements for dermatology residency programs. Objective: This study explored the state of geriatrics education in dermatology programs in 2016. Methods: This constructivist study employed cross-sectional, mixed-methods analysis with triangulation of semistructured interviews, surveys, and commonly used curricular materials...
December 2018: Journal of Graduate Medical Education
https://read.qxmd.com/read/30619522/psychological-safety-and-support-assessing-resident-perceptions-of-the-clinical-learning-environment
#19
Nital P Appelbaum, Sally A Santen, Brian M Aboff, Ryan Vega, Jose L Munoz, Robin R Hemphill
Background: Assessments of the clinical learning environment could allow early interventions to improve graduate medical education. To date, measurement tools for this have not been identified. Objective: We established the concurrent validity of 2 instruments that assess cultural facets of the clinical learning environment by correlating them with external program evaluation data. Methods: In 2017 we surveyed residents across 19 training programs on their perceptions of organizational support by using the Short Survey of Perceived Organizational Support (SPOS), and psychological safety by using the Psychological Safety Scale (PSS)...
December 2018: Journal of Graduate Medical Education
https://read.qxmd.com/read/30619521/a-consensus-approach-to-identify-tiered-competencies-in-quality-improvement-and-patient-safety
#20
Brennan D Kruszewski, Nathan O Spell
Background: Quality improvement and patient safety (QI/PS) competencies have been proposed separately for undergraduate medical education (UME) and graduate medical education (GME). The work forms a foundation at each educational level, yet curriculum development would benefit from more specific guidance that considers the continuum of physician training. Objective: We identified a core set of QI/PS items to be taught during medical school, residency, and independent practice, with specificity to guide curriculum development at each level...
December 2018: Journal of Graduate Medical Education
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