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Simulation in Healthcare: Journal of the Society for Simulation in Healthcare

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https://read.qxmd.com/read/30730471/comparisons-of-stress-physiology-of-providers-in-real-life-resuscitations-and-virtual-reality-simulated-resuscitations
#1
Todd P Chang, Youssef Beshay, Trevor Hollinger, Joshua M Sherman
BACKGROUND: Virtual reality (VR) is a promising simulation medium for high-stakes, low-frequency events such as pediatric resuscitation. The psychological fidelity of VR compared with a real resuscitation in an emergency department (ED) is relatively unknown. The objective was to determine whether stress physiology changes were equivalent between ED and VR resuscitations. METHODS: This was a single-site pilot equivalence study evaluating head-mounted VR resuscitation scenarios using board-certified/eligible pediatric ED physicians...
February 5, 2019: Simulation in Healthcare: Journal of the Society for Simulation in Healthcare
https://read.qxmd.com/read/30730470/-nightmares-family-medicine-course-is-an-effective-acute-care-teaching-tool-for-family-medicine-residents
#2
Filip Gilic, Karen Schultz, Ian Sempowski, Ana Blagojevic
INTRODUCTION: Simulation is an effective method for teaching acute care skills but has not been comprehensively evaluated with family medicine (FM) residents. We developed a comprehensive simulation-based approach for teaching acute care skills to FM residents and assessed it for effectiveness. METHOD: We compared the effectiveness of our standard acute care simulation training [Acute Care Rounds (ACR)] to a more comprehensive simulation-based acute care program, Nightmares-Family Medicine (NM)...
February 5, 2019: Simulation in Healthcare: Journal of the Society for Simulation in Healthcare
https://read.qxmd.com/read/30730469/a-simple-low-cost-method-to-integrate-telehealth-interprofessional-team-members-during-in-situ-simulation
#3
William F Bond, Lisa T Barker, Kimberly L Cooley, Jessica D Svendsen, William P Tillis, Andrew L Vincent, John A Vozenilek, Emilie S Powell
INTRODUCTION: With the growth of telehealth, simulation personnel will be called upon to support training that integrates these new technologies and processes. We sought to integrate remote telehealth electronic intensive care unit (eICU) personnel into in situ simulations with rural emergency department (ED) care teams. We describe how we overcame technical challenges of creating shared awareness of the patient's condition and the care team's progress among those executing the simulation, the care team, and the eICU...
February 5, 2019: Simulation in Healthcare: Journal of the Society for Simulation in Healthcare
https://read.qxmd.com/read/30730468/exploring-the-influence-of-language-on-assessment-given-a-mismatch-between-language-of-instruction-and-language-of-practice
#4
Mohammad I Diab, Ziad G Nasr, Maguy S El-Hajj, Hazem Elewa, Hager A El-Geed, Kyle John Wilby
A phenomenon is occurring in international settings where the language of program delivery and assessment does not match the primary language of practice. It is unknown whether determining competence in English disadvantages students for practice in non-English settings. As such, we conducted a pilot study to determine student performance and perceptions after completion of two Objective Structured Clinical Examinations (OSCEs) examinations, one conducted in English and one conducted in Arabic within an Arabic-speaking Middle Eastern setting...
February 5, 2019: Simulation in Healthcare: Journal of the Society for Simulation in Healthcare
https://read.qxmd.com/read/30730467/using-mirror-patients-to-enhance-patient-safety
#5
Ilana Harwayne-Gidansky, Kathleen Culver, Sean Cavanaugh, Rahul Panesar
Unannounced, in situ simulations offer opportunities for interprofessional teams to train for pediatric emergencies and uncover latent safety threats (LST). Simulation fidelity is an important component of in situ simulations. Threats to fidelity include creating a fictional patient vignette, which limits realism and the opportunity for patient handoffs. The "mirror patient" model may enhance in situ simulation fidelity by using actual patient profiles, thereby removing vignettes and allowing for handoffs...
February 5, 2019: Simulation in Healthcare: Journal of the Society for Simulation in Healthcare
https://read.qxmd.com/read/30601469/a-systematic-review-of-the-educational-effectiveness-of-simulation-used-in-open-surgery
#6
Leonie Heskin, Ciaran Simms, Jane Holland, Oscar Traynor, Rose Galvin
The role of simulation to teach and access open surgical skills has become more prevalent in recent years. This systematic review synthesizes the totality of evidence with respect to the educational effectiveness of simulators used in open surgical training.A systematic literature search was conducted in PubMed, Embase, CINAHL, Scopus, and Web of Science. Only randomized controlled trials were included that explored the educational efficacy of theses simulators. Six randomized controlled trials were included from the 9934 studies found...
December 29, 2018: Simulation in Healthcare: Journal of the Society for Simulation in Healthcare
https://read.qxmd.com/read/30601467/the-impact-of-phone-interruptions-on-the-quality-of-simulated-medication-order-validation-using-eye-tracking-a-pilot-study
#7
Maxime Thibault, Céline Porteils, Stéphanie Goulois, Arielle Lévy, Denis Lebel, Jean-François Bussières
INTRODUCTION: Order validation is an important component of pharmacy services, where pharmacists review orders with a focus on error prevention. Interruptions are frequent and may contribute to a reduction in error detection, thus potential medication errors. However, studying such errors in practice is difficult. Simulation has potential to study these events. METHODS: This was a pilot, simulation study. The primary objective was to determine the rate of medication error detection and the effect of interruptions on error detection during simulated validation...
December 29, 2018: Simulation in Healthcare: Journal of the Society for Simulation in Healthcare
https://read.qxmd.com/read/30601466/can-haptic-simulators-distinguish-expert-performance-a-case-study-in-central-venous-catheterization-in-surgical-education
#8
Hong-En Chen, Mary A Yovanoff, David F Pepley, Cheyenne C Sonntag, Katelin A Mirkin, David C Han, Jason Z Moore, Scarlett R Miller
INTRODUCTION: High-tech simulators are gaining popularity in surgical training programs because of their potential for improving clinical outcomes. However, most simulators are static in nature and only represent a single anatomical patient configuration. The Dynamic Haptic Robotic Training (DHRT) system was developed to simulate these diverse patient anatomies during Central Venous Catheterization (CVC) training. This article explores the use of the DHRT system to evaluate objective metrics for CVC insertion by comparing the performance of experts and novices...
December 29, 2018: Simulation in Healthcare: Journal of the Society for Simulation in Healthcare
https://read.qxmd.com/read/30601465/self-reported-emotions-in-simulation-based-learning-active-participants-vs-observers
#9
Timothy Rogers, Carly Andler, Bridget OʼBrien, Sandrijn van Schaik
INTRODUCTION: Experiential learning through active participation is thought to be a key benefit of simulation-based education. Recent research has challenged this assumption, suggesting that active participants learn just as well as observers. Studies report that active participants experience stress and anxiety during simulation, which may hamper learning by active participants. We undertook the current study to examine whether active participation results in different emotional arousal than observing during simulation...
December 29, 2018: Simulation in Healthcare: Journal of the Society for Simulation in Healthcare
https://read.qxmd.com/read/30601464/virtual-reality-simulation-in-nontechnical-skills-training-for-healthcare-professionals-a-systematic-review
#10
Marie-Stéphanie Bracq, Estelle Michinov, Pierre Jannin
This systematic review, conducted in accordance with the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses guidelines, is aimed to review current research in virtual reality (VR) for healthcare training, specifically pertaining to nontechnical skills. PsycInfo and Medline databases were queried for relevant articles published through December 2017. Of the 1377 publications identified, 80 were assessed for eligibility and 26 were finally included in the qualitative synthesis. Overall, the use of virtual training for nontechnical skills is recent in healthcare education and has increased since 2010...
December 29, 2018: Simulation in Healthcare: Journal of the Society for Simulation in Healthcare
https://read.qxmd.com/read/30601468/feasibility-of-simulation-based-medical-education-in-a-low-income-country-challenges-and-solutions-from-a-3-year-pilot-program-in-uganda
#11
Fred Bulamba, Cornelius Sendagire, Andrew Kintu, Adam Hewitt-Smith, Fred Musana, Maytinee Lilaonitkul, Emmanuel T Ayebale, Tyler Law, Gerald Dubowitz, Olivia Kituuka, Michael S Lipnick
Simulation is relatively new in many low-income countries. We describe the challenges encountered, solutions deployed, and the costs incurred while establishing two simulation centers in Uganda. The challenges we experienced included equipment costs, difficulty in procurement, lack of context-appropriate curricula, unreliable power, limited local teaching capacity, and lack of coordination among user groups. Solutions we deployed included improvisation of equipment, customization of low-cost simulation software, creation of context-specific curricula, local administrative support, and creation of a simulation fellowship opportunity for local instructors...
December 28, 2018: Simulation in Healthcare: Journal of the Society for Simulation in Healthcare
https://read.qxmd.com/read/30707206/multiple-patient-casualty-scenarios-a-measurement-tool-for-teamwork-erratum
#12
(no author information available yet)
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
February 2019: Simulation in Healthcare: Journal of the Society for Simulation in Healthcare
https://read.qxmd.com/read/30520805/using-simulation-to-teach-echocardiography-a-systematic-review
#13
Cecil A Rambarat, Justin M Merritt, Hannah F Norton, Erik Black, David E Winchester
We identified 24 studies of high-fidelity simulation being used to teach echocardiography. A variety of study designs were used with outcomes ranging from reports of learner self-confidence up to improvement in organizational practice. Most studies were carried out in graduate medical populations, specifically in anesthesia trainees. The substantial majority of studies (91.6%) concluded that simulation has positive outcomes for teaching echocardiography. Future investigations would benefit from application of educational theory and should focus on demonstrating whether simulation can improve care delivery and patient outcomes...
December 2018: Simulation in Healthcare: Journal of the Society for Simulation in Healthcare
https://read.qxmd.com/read/30499869/simulation-safety-first-an-imperative
#14
Daniel Raemer, Alexander Hannenberg, Ann Mullen
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
December 2018: Simulation in Healthcare: Journal of the Society for Simulation in Healthcare
https://read.qxmd.com/read/30407961/simulation-based-education-to-train-learners-to-speak-up-in-the-clinical-environment-results-of-a-randomized-trial
#15
Ceyda Oner, Nelli Fisher, Fouad Atallah, Mary Ann Son, Peter Homel, Katerina Mykhalchenko, Howard Minkoff
INTRODUCTION: Assertiveness is essential for communication and/or speaking up. We performed a randomized trial to assess the effectiveness of assertiveness/advocacy/CUS/two-challenge rule (AACT) simulation-based education for labor and delivery, as well as postpartum nurses. We aimed to determine whether this training would improve labor and delivery and postpartum nurses speaking up in the clinical setting. METHODS: We conducted a randomized controlled trial among nurses on labor and delivery and postpartum units...
December 2018: Simulation in Healthcare: Journal of the Society for Simulation in Healthcare
https://read.qxmd.com/read/30407958/comparative-analysis-of-emergency-medical-service-provider-workload-during-simulated-out-of-hospital-cardiac-arrest-resuscitation-using-standard-versus-experimental-protocols-and-equipment
#16
Nicholas Asselin, Bryan Choi, Catherine C Pettit, Max Dannecker, Jason T Machan, Derek L Merck, Lisa H Merck, Selim Suner, Kenneth A Williams, Janette Baird, Gregory D Jay, Leo Kobayashi
INTRODUCTION: Protocolized automation of critical, labor-intensive tasks for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) resuscitation may decrease Emergency Medical Services (EMS) provider workload. A simulation-based assessment method incorporating objective and self-reported metrics was developed and used to quantify workloads associated with standard and experimental approaches to OHCA resuscitation. METHODS: Emergency Medical Services-Basic (EMT-B) and advanced life support (ALS) providers were randomized into two-provider mixed-level teams and fitted with heart rate (HR) monitors for continuous HR and energy expenditure (EE) monitoring...
December 2018: Simulation in Healthcare: Journal of the Society for Simulation in Healthcare
https://read.qxmd.com/read/30407957/multiple-patient-casualty-scenarios-a-measurement-tool-for-teamwork
#17
Shannon L Marlow, Wendy L Bedwell, Stephanie Zajac, Denise L Reyes, Michelle LaMar, Saad Khan, Joseph Lopreiato, Eduardo Salas
INTRODUCTION: Teamwork is a critical aspect of patient care and is especially salient in response to multiple patient casualties. Effective training and measurement improve team performance. However, the literature currently lacks a scientifically developed measure of team performance within multiple causality scenarios, making training and feedback efforts difficult. The present effort addresses this gap by integrating the input of subject matter experts and the science of multicasualty teams and training to (1) identify overarching teamwork processes and corresponding behaviors necessary for team performance and (2) develop a behavioral observation tool to optimize teamwork in multicasualty training efforts...
December 2018: Simulation in Healthcare: Journal of the Society for Simulation in Healthcare
https://read.qxmd.com/read/30407960/the-use-of-statistical-process-control-charts-to-evaluate-interprofessional-education-sessions-embedded-into-a-pediatric-emergency-in-situ-resuscitation-program
#18
Jonathan Pirie, Sandra Cardenas, Wail Seleem, Dragan Kljujic, Suzan Schneeweiss, Carrie Glanfield, Tania Principi
The rigorous evaluation of simulation in healthcare to improve resuscitations and team functioning can be challenging. Statistical process control (SPC) charts present a unique methodology to enable statistical rigor when evaluating simulation. This article presents a brief overview of SPC charts and its advantages over traditional before and after methodologies, followed by an exemplar using SPC to evaluate an in situ team training program with embedded interprofessional education sessions.
November 7, 2018: Simulation in Healthcare: Journal of the Society for Simulation in Healthcare
https://read.qxmd.com/read/30407959/using-an-immersive-virtual-reality-system-to-assess-lay-provider-response-to-an-unannounced-simulated-sudden-cardiac-arrest-in-the-out-of-hospital-setting
#19
Marion Leary, Alfredo Almodovar, David G Buckler, Abhishek Bhardwaj, Audrey L Blewer, Benjamin S Abella
BACKGROUND: A sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) occurs when the heart abruptly stops beating; because of the nature of SCA, capturing data in the out-of-hospital setting from actual bystander response is difficult. Current technologies such as virtual reality (VR) allow the creation of scenarios programmed for heightened realism. No studies have used an immersive VR system to observe lay bystander response. OBJECTIVE: We sought to characterize lay bystander response to an unannounced simulated VR SCA event during a multisensory scenario...
November 7, 2018: Simulation in Healthcare: Journal of the Society for Simulation in Healthcare
https://read.qxmd.com/read/30407956/social-network-analysis-of-a-simulation-community
#20
Richard H Riley, Cai Kjaer, A Carol Cheney, Svetlana Naumovski, Brodene L Straw
INTRODUCTION: Graphical analysis of networking maps can be used to measure the health, connectivity, and vulnerabilities of a professional community. We aimed to capture and map the connections and relationships between individuals and organizations in the healthcare simulation community of the state of Western Australia. It was also intended that this analysis would encourage new opportunities for collaboration to advance simulation-based education. METHODS: In association with a baseline list of established simulation practitioners, an online survey instrument and propriety mapping software were used to establish links and interactions between individuals, colleagues, their own, and external organizations...
November 7, 2018: Simulation in Healthcare: Journal of the Society for Simulation in Healthcare
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