journal
MENU ▼
Read by QxMD icon Read
search

Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics: CQ: the International Journal of Healthcare Ethics Committees

journal
https://read.qxmd.com/read/30832748/involving-patients-in-research-responsible-research-and-innovation-in-small-and-medium-sized-european-health-care-enterprises-addendum
#1
Kalypso Iordanou
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
March 5, 2019: Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics: CQ: the International Journal of Healthcare Ethics Committees
https://read.qxmd.com/read/30570474/advance-directives-and-code-status-information-exchange-a-consensus-proposal-for-a-minimum-set-of-attributes
#2
Christoph U Lehmann, Carolyn Petersen, Haresh Bhatia, Eta S Berner, Kenneth W Goodman
Documentation of code status and advance directives for end-of-life (EOL) care improves care and quality of life, decreases cost of care, and increases the likelihood of an experience desired by the patient and his/her family. However, the use of advance directives and code status remains low and only a few organizations maintain code status in electronic form. Members of the American Medical Informatics Association's Ethics Committee identified a need for a patient's EOL care wishes to be documented correctly and communicated easily through the electronic health record (EHR) using a minimum data set for the storage and exchange of code status information...
January 2019: Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics: CQ: the International Journal of Healthcare Ethics Committees
https://read.qxmd.com/read/30570473/-go-ask-alice-the-case-for-researching-schedule-i-drugs
#3
Kenneth V Iserson
The available treatments for disorders affecting large segments of the population are often costly, complex, and only marginally effective, and many have numerous side effects. These disorders include dementias, debilitating neurological disorders, the multiple types of drug addiction, and the spectrum of mental health disorders.Preliminary studies have shown that a variety of psychedelic and similar U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration Schedule I drugs may offer better treatment options than those that currently exist and pose potentially the same or even less risk than do legal psychoactive (alcohol, caffeine, nicotine) and nonpsychoactive (aspirin, acetaminophen, ibuprofen) substances...
January 2019: Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics: CQ: the International Journal of Healthcare Ethics Committees
https://read.qxmd.com/read/30570472/john-harris-an-appreciation
#4
John J Paris
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
January 2019: Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics: CQ: the International Journal of Healthcare Ethics Committees
https://read.qxmd.com/read/30570471/editorial-looking-for-justice-from-the-health-industry
#5
Doris Schroeder, Julie Cook
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
January 2019: Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics: CQ: the International Journal of Healthcare Ethics Committees
https://read.qxmd.com/read/30570470/a-defense-of-limited-regulation-of-human-genetic-therapies
#6
James J Hughes
There is a role for regulatory oversight over new genetic technologies. Research must ensure the rights of human subjects, and all medical products and techniques should be ensured to be safe and effective. In the United States, these forms of regulation are largely the purview of the National Institutes of Health and the Food and Drug Administration. Some have argued, however, that human genetic therapies require new regulatory agencies empowered to enforce cultural norms, protect against hypothetical social harms, or ensure that the human genome remains unchanged...
January 2019: Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics: CQ: the International Journal of Healthcare Ethics Committees
https://read.qxmd.com/read/30570469/let-us-assume-that-gene-editing-is-safe-the-role-of-safety-arguments-in-the-gene-editing-debate
#7
Søren Holm
This paper provides an analysis of the statement, made in many papers and reports on the use of gene editing in humans, that we should only use the technology when it is safe. It provides an analysis of what the statement means in the context of nonreproductive and reproductive gene editing and argues that the statement is inconsistent with the philosophical commitments of some of the authors, who put it forward in relation to reproductive uses of gene editing, specifically their commitment to Parfitian nonidentity considerations and to a legal principle of reproductive liberty...
January 2019: Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics: CQ: the International Journal of Healthcare Ethics Committees
https://read.qxmd.com/read/30570468/gene-drives-and-genome-modification-in-nonhuman-animals-a-concern-for-informed-consent
#8
Joanna Smolenski
In recent years, CRISPR-Cas9 has become one of the simplest and most cost-effective genetic engineering techniques among scientists and researchers aiming to alter genes in organisms. As Zika came to the fore as a global health crisis, many suggested the use of CRISPR-Cas9 gene drives in mosquitoes as a possible means to prevent the transmission of the virus without the need to subject humans to risky experimental treatments. This paper suggests that using gene drives or other forms of genome editing in nonhumans (like mosquitos) for the purposes of disease prevention raises important issues about informed consent...
January 2019: Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics: CQ: the International Journal of Healthcare Ethics Committees
https://read.qxmd.com/read/30570467/commentary-enlightened-democracy-in-practice
#9
Oliver Feeney
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
January 2019: Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics: CQ: the International Journal of Healthcare Ethics Committees
https://read.qxmd.com/read/30570466/regulating-genome-editing-for-an-enlightened-democratic-governance
#10
Giulia Cavaliere, Katrien Devolder, Alberto Giubilini
How should we regulate genome editing in the face of persistent substantive disagreement about the moral status of this technology and its applications? In this paper, we aim to contribute to resolving this question. We first present two diametrically opposed possible approaches to the regulation of genome editing. A first approach, which we refer to as "elitist," is inspired by Joshua Greene's work in moral psychology. It aims to derive at an abstract theoretical level what preferences people would have if they were committed to implementing public policies regulating genome editing in a context of ethical pluralism...
January 2019: Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics: CQ: the International Journal of Healthcare Ethics Committees
https://read.qxmd.com/read/30570465/can-the-thought-of-teilhard-de-chardin-carry-us-past-current-contentious-discussions-of-gene-editing-technologies
#11
Mária Šuleková, Kevin T Fitzgerald
The advent of CRISPR-Cas9 technology has increased attention, and contention, regarding the use and regulation of genome editing technologies. Public discussions continue to give evidence of this debate falling back into the previous polarized positions of technological enthusiasts versus those who are more cautious in their approach. One response to this contentious relapse could be to view this promising and problematic new technology from a radically different perspective that embraces both the excitement of this technological advance and the prudence necessary to use it well...
January 2019: Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics: CQ: the International Journal of Healthcare Ethics Committees
https://read.qxmd.com/read/30570464/commentary-the-implementation-ethics-of-moral-enhancement
#12
Nicholas Agar
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
January 2019: Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics: CQ: the International Journal of Healthcare Ethics Committees
https://read.qxmd.com/read/30570463/genome-editing-for-involuntary-moral-enhancement
#13
Vojin Rakić
During the previous years, voluntary moral bioenhancement (VMBE) has been contrasted to compulsory moral bioenhancement (CMBE). In this paper a third possible type of moral bioenhancement is discussed: genome editing for moral enhancement of the unborn that is neither voluntary nor compulsory, but involuntary. Involuntary moral bioenhancement (IMBE) might engineer people who will be more moral than they otherwise would have been. The possibilities of genome editing aimed at moral enhancement of our offspring is assessed...
January 2019: Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics: CQ: the International Journal of Healthcare Ethics Committees
https://read.qxmd.com/read/30570462/commentary-setting-the-bar-higher
#14
Nicolas Delon
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
January 2019: Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics: CQ: the International Journal of Healthcare Ethics Committees
https://read.qxmd.com/read/30570461/gene-doping-in-animals-ethical-issues-at-the-intersection-of-animal-use-gene-editing-and-sports-ethics
#15
Carolyn P Neuhaus, Brendan Parent
Gene editors such as CRISPR could be used to create stronger, faster, or more resilient nonhuman animals. This is of keen interest to people who breed, train, race, and profit off the millions of animals used in sport that contribute billions of dollars to legal and illegal economies across the globe. People have tried for millennia to perfect sport animals; CRISPR proposes to do in one generation what might have taken decades previously. Moreover, gene editing may facilitate enhancing animals' capacities beyond their typical limits...
January 2019: Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics: CQ: the International Journal of Healthcare Ethics Committees
https://read.qxmd.com/read/30570460/commentary-from-liberal-eugenics-to-political-biology
#16
Nathan Emmerich, Bert Gordijn
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
January 2019: Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics: CQ: the International Journal of Healthcare Ethics Committees
https://read.qxmd.com/read/30570459/why-we-should-defend-gene-editing-as-eugenics
#17
Nicholas Agar
This paper considers the relevance of the concept of "eugenics,"-a term associated with some of the most egregious crimes of the twentieth century-to the possibility of editing human genomes. The author identifies some uses of gene editing as eugenics but proposes that this identification does not suffice to condemn them. He proposes that we should distinguish between "morally wrong" practices, which should be condemned, and "morally problematic" practices that call for solutions, and he suggests that eugenic uses of gene editing fall into this latter category...
January 2019: Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics: CQ: the International Journal of Healthcare Ethics Committees
https://read.qxmd.com/read/30720415/pragmatic-neuroethics-lived-experiences-as-a-source-of-moral-knowledge
#18
Gabriela Pavarini, Ilina Singh
In this article, we present a pragmatic approach to neuroethics, referring back to John Dewey and his articulation of the "common good" and its discovery through systematic methods. Pragmatic neuroethics bridges philosophy and social sciences and, at a very basic level, considers that ethics is not dissociable from lived experiences and everyday moral choices. We reflect on the integration between empirical methods and normative questions, using as our platform recent bioethical and neuropsychological research into moral cognition, action, and experience...
October 2018: Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics: CQ: the International Journal of Healthcare Ethics Committees
https://read.qxmd.com/read/30720414/the-new-ethics-of-neuroethics
#19
Tom Buller
According to a familiar distinction, neuroethics incorporates the neuroscience of ethics and the ethics of neuroscience. Within neuroethics, these two parts have provoked distinct and separate lines of inquiry, and there has been little discussion of how the two parts overlap. In the present article, I try to draw a connection between these two parts by considering the implications that are raised for ethics by scientific findings about the way we make moral decisions. The main argument of the article is that although neuroscience is "stretching" ethics by revealing the empirical basis of our moral decisions and, thereby, challenging our present understanding of the dominant ethical theories, substantial further questions remain regarding the impact that neuroscience will have on ethics more broadly...
October 2018: Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics: CQ: the International Journal of Healthcare Ethics Committees
https://read.qxmd.com/read/30720413/neurolaw-and-neuroethics
#20
Jennifer A Chandler
This short article proposes a conceptual structure for "neurolaw," modeled loosely on the bipartite division of the sister field of neuroethics by Adina Roskies into the "ethics of neuroscience" and the "neuroscience of ethics." As normative fields addressing the implications of scientific discoveries and expanding technological capacities affecting the brain, "neurolaw" and neuroethics have followed parallel paths. Similar foundational questions arise for both about the validity and utility of recognizing them as distinct subfields of law and ethics, respectively...
October 2018: Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics: CQ: the International Journal of Healthcare Ethics Committees
journal
journal
31042
1
2
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read
×

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"