journal
https://read.qxmd.com/read/38865189/meiosis-specific-functions-of-kinetochore-protein-spc105r-required-for-chromosome-segregation-in-drosophila-oocytes
#1
JOURNAL ARTICLE
Jay N Joshi, Neha Changela, Lia Mahal, Janet Jang, Tyler Defosse, Lin-Ing Wang, Arunika Das, Joanatta G Shapiro, Kim McKim
The reductional division of meiosis I requires the separation of chromosome pairs towards opposite poles. We have previously implicated the outer kinetochore protein SPC105R/KNL1 in driving meiosis I chromosome segregation through lateral attachments to microtubules and co-orientation of sister centromeres. To identify the domains of SPC105R that are critical for meiotic chromosome segregation, an RNAi-resistant gene expression system was developed. We found that the SPC105R C-terminal domain (aa 1284-1960) is necessary and sufficient for recruiting NDC80 to the kinetochore and building the outer kinetochore...
June 12, 2024: Molecular Biology of the Cell
https://read.qxmd.com/read/38865179/transient-pp2a-sip-complex-localization-to-mitotic-spbs-for-sin-inhibition-is-mediated-solely-by-the-csc1-fha-domain
#2
JOURNAL ARTICLE
Alaina H Willet, Liping Ren, Lesley A Turner, Kathleen L Gould
Many organisms utilize an actin- and myosin-based cytokinetic ring to help complete cytokinesis. In Schizosaccharomyces pombe , the Septation Initiation Network (SIN) promotes proper CR function and stability. The SIN is a conserved and essential signaling network consisting of a GTPase and a cascade of kinases assembled at the spindle pole body (SPB). The PP2A SIN inhibitory phosphatase (SIP) complex related to the STRIPAK phosphatase complex is one inhibitor of SIN signaling. The SIP consists of Csc1, Csc2, Csc3, Csc4, Paa1, and the phosphatase subunit Ppa3...
June 12, 2024: Molecular Biology of the Cell
https://read.qxmd.com/read/38865178/lrrc56-is-an-ift-cargo-required-for-assembly-of-the-distal-dynein-docking-complex-in-trypanosoma-brucei
#3
JOURNAL ARTICLE
Serge Bonnefoy, Aline Araujo Alves, Eloïse Bertiaux, Philippe Bastin
Outer dynein arms (ODAs) are responsible for ciliary beating in eukaryotes. They are assembled in the cytoplasm and shipped by intraflagellar transport (IFT) before attachment to microtubule doublets via the docking complex. The LRRC56 protein has been proposed to contribute to ODAs maturation. Mutations or deletion of the LRRC56 gene lead to reduced ciliary motility in all species investigated so far, but with variable impact on dynein arm presence. Here, we investigated the role of LRRC56 in the protist Trypanosoma brucei, where its absence results in distal loss of ODAs, mostly in growing flagella...
June 12, 2024: Molecular Biology of the Cell
https://read.qxmd.com/read/38865176/-caulobacter-crescentus-rnase-e-condensation-contributes-to-autoregulation-and-fitness
#4
JOURNAL ARTICLE
Vidhyadhar Nandana, Nadra Al-Husini, Arti Vaishnav, Kulathungage H Dilrangi, Jared M Schrader
RNase E is the most common RNA decay nuclease in bacteria, setting the global mRNA decay rate and scaffolding formation of the RNA degradosome complex and BR-bodies. To properly set the global mRNA decay rate, RNase E from Escherichia coli and neighboring γ-proteobacteria were found to autoregulate RNase E levels via the decay of its mRNA's 5' UTR. While the 5' UTR is absent from other groups of bacteria in the Rfam database, we identified that the α-proteobacterium Caulobacter crescentus RNase E contains a similar 5' UTR structure that promotes RNase E autoregulation...
June 12, 2024: Molecular Biology of the Cell
https://read.qxmd.com/read/38837346/image-based-discrimination-of-the-early-stages-of-mesenchymal-stem-cell-differentiation
#5
JOURNAL ARTICLE
Justin Hoffman, Shiyuan Zheng, Huaiying Zhang, Robert F Murphy, Kris Noel Dahl
Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are self-renewing, multipotent cells, which can be used in cellular and tissue therapeutics. MSCs cell number can be expanded in vitro, but premature differentiation results in reduced cell number and compromised therapeutic efficacies. Current techniques fail to discriminate the "stem-like" population from early stages (12 hours) of differentiated MSC population. Here, we imaged nuclear structure and actin architecture using immunofluorescence and used deep learning-based computer vision technology to discriminate the early stages (6-12 hours) of MSC differentiation...
June 5, 2024: Molecular Biology of the Cell
https://read.qxmd.com/read/38809589/optimization-of-the-fluorogen-activating-protein-tag-for-quantitative-protein-trafficking-and-co-localization-studies-in-s-cerevisiae
#6
JOURNAL ARTICLE
Katherine G Oppenheimer, Natalie A Hager, Ceara K McAtee, Elif Filiztekin, Chaowei Shang, Justina A Warnick, Marcel P Bruchez, Jeffrey L Brodsky, Derek C Prosser, Adam V Kwiatkowski, Allyson F O'Donnell
Spatial and temporal tracking of fluorescent proteins in live cells permits visualization of proteome remodeling in response to extracellular cues. Historically, protein dynamics during trafficking have been visualized using constitutively active fluorescent proteins (FPs) fused to proteins of interest. While powerful, such FPs label all cellular pools of a protein, potentially masking the dynamics of select subpopulations. To help study protein subpopulations, bioconjugate tags, including the fluorogen activation proteins (FAPs), were developed...
May 29, 2024: Molecular Biology of the Cell
https://read.qxmd.com/read/38809584/a-novel-non-canonical-function-for-irf6-in-the-recycling-of-e-cadherin
#7
JOURNAL ARTICLE
Angelo Antiguas, Martine Dunnwald
Interferon Regulatory Factor 6 (IRF6) is a transcription factor essential for keratinocyte cell-cell adhesions. Previously, we found that recycling of E-cadherin was defective in the absence of IRF6, yet total E-cadherin levels were not altered, suggesting a previously unknown, non-transcriptional function for IRF6. IRF6 protein contains a DNA binding domain (DBD) and a protein binding domain (PBD). The transcriptional function of IRF6 depends on its DBD and PBD, however, whether the PBD is necessary for the interaction with cytoplasmic proteins has yet to be demonstrated...
May 29, 2024: Molecular Biology of the Cell
https://read.qxmd.com/read/38809582/the-myosin-chaperone-unc-45-has-an-important-role-in-maintaining-the-structure-and-function-of-muscle-sarcomeres-during-adult-aging
#8
JOURNAL ARTICLE
Courtney J Matheny, Hiroshi Qadota, Aaron O Bailey, Silvana Valdebenito-Silva, Andres F Oberhauser, Guy M Benian
C. elegans undergo age-dependent declines in muscle organization and function, similar to human sarcopenia. The chaperone UNC-45 is required to fold myosin heads after translation and is likely used for re-folding after thermally- or chemically-induced unfolding. UNC-45's TPR region binds Hsp90 and its UCS domain binds myosin heads. We observe early onset sarcopenia when UNC-45 is reduced at the beginning of adulthood. There is sequential decline of HSP-90, UNC-45, and MHC B myosin. A mutation in age-1 delays sarcopenia and loss of HSP-90, UNC-45 and myosin...
May 29, 2024: Molecular Biology of the Cell
https://read.qxmd.com/read/38809580/fluorescent-protein-tags-affect-the-condensation-properties-of-a-phase-separating-viral-protein
#9
JOURNAL ARTICLE
Russell J R Barkley, Jack C Crowley, Andrew J Brodrick, Warren R Zipfel, John S L Parker
Fluorescent protein (FP) tags are extensively used to visualize and characterize the properties of biomolecular condensates despite a lack of investigation into the effects of these tags on phase separation. Here, we characterized the dynamic properties of µNS, a viral protein hypothesized to undergo phase separation and the main component of mammalian orthoreovirus viral factories. Our interest in the sequence determinants and nucleation process of µNS phase separation led us to compare the size and density of condensates formed by FP::µNS to the untagged protein...
May 29, 2024: Molecular Biology of the Cell
https://read.qxmd.com/read/38776129/sur7-mediates-a-novel-pathway-for-pi-4-5-p-2-regulation-in-c-albicans-that-promotes-stress-resistance-and-cell-wall-morphogenesis
#10
JOURNAL ARTICLE
Carla E Lanze, James B Konopka
The human fungal pathogen Candida albicans can cause lethal systemic infections due to its ability to resist stress from the host and to undergo invasive hyphal growth. Previous studies showed that plasma membrane MCC/eisosome domains were important for virulence by promoting the ability of Sur7 to mediate normal cell wall morphogenesis and stress resistance. The sur7Δ mutant displayed abnormal clusters of PI4,5 P2 , suggesting that misregulation of this lipid underlies the sur7Δ phenotype. To test this, we increased PI4,5 P2 levels by deleting combinations of the three PI4,5 P2 5' phosphatase genes ( INP51 , INP52 , and INP54 ) and found that some combinations, such as inp51Δ inp52Δ , gave phenotypes similar the sur7Δ mutant...
May 22, 2024: Molecular Biology of the Cell
https://read.qxmd.com/read/38776127/differential-reliance-of-ctd-nuclear-envelope-phosphatase-1-on-its-regulatory-subunit-in-er-lipid-synthesis-and-storage
#11
JOURNAL ARTICLE
Jake W Carrasquillo Rodríguez, Onyedikachi Uche, Shujuan Gao, Shoken Lee, Michael V Airola, Shirin Bahmanyar
Lipin 1 is an ER enzyme that produces diacylglycerol, the lipid intermediate that feeds into the synthesis of glycerophospholipids for membrane expansion or triacylglycerol for storage into lipid droplets. CTD-Nuclear Envelope Phosphatase 1 (CTDNEP1) regulates lipin 1 to restrict ER membrane synthesis, but a role for CTDNEP1 in lipid storage in mammalian cells is not known. Here, we show that CTDNEP1 is reliant on its binding partner NEP1R1 for its stability and function in limiting ER expansion. CTDNEP1 contains an amphipathic helix at its N-terminus that targets to the ER, nuclear envelope and lipid droplets...
May 22, 2024: Molecular Biology of the Cell
https://read.qxmd.com/read/38758663/tubulin-glycylation-controls-ciliary-motility-through-modulation-of-outer-arm-dyneins
#12
JOURNAL ARTICLE
Tomohiro Kubo, Rinka Sasaki, Toshiyuki Oda
Tubulins undergo several post-translational modifications (PTMs) including glutamylation and glycylation. The contribution of these PTMs to the motilities of cilia and flagella is still unclear. Here, we investigated the role of tubulin glycylation by examining a novel Chlamydomonas mutant lacking TTLL3, an enzyme responsible for initiating glycylation. Immunostaining of cells and flagella revealed that glycylation is only restricted to the axonemal tubulin composing the outer-doublet but not the central-pair microtubules...
May 17, 2024: Molecular Biology of the Cell
https://read.qxmd.com/read/38758660/a-pacap-activated-network-for-secretion-requires-coordination-of-ca-2-influx-and-ca-2-mobilization
#13
JOURNAL ARTICLE
Xiaohuan Chen, Nicole A Bell, Breanna L Coffman, Agustin A Rabino, Rafael Garcia-Mata, Paul J Kammermeier, David I Yule, Daniel Axelrod, Alan V Smrcka, David R Giovannucci, Arun Anantharam
Chromaffin cells of the adrenal medulla transduce sympathetic nerve activity into stress hormone secretion. The two neurotransmitters principally responsible for coupling cell stimulation to secretion are acetylcholine and pituitary adenylate activating polypeptide (PACAP). In contrast to acetylcholine, PACAP evokes a persistent secretory response from chromaffin cells. However, the mechanisms by which PACAP acts are poorly understood. Here, it is shown that PACAP induces sustained increases in cytosolic Ca2+ which are disrupted when Ca2+ influx through L-type channels is blocked or internal Ca2+ stores are depleted...
May 17, 2024: Molecular Biology of the Cell
https://read.qxmd.com/read/38758658/matrix-stiffening-promotes-perinuclear-clustering-of-mitochondria
#14
JOURNAL ARTICLE
Piyush Daga, Basil Thurakkal, Simran Rawal, Tamal Das
Mechanical cues from the tissue microenvironment, such as the stiffness of the extracellular matrix, modulate cellular forms and functions. As numerous studies have shown, this modulation depends on the stiffness-dependent remodeling of cytoskeletal elements. In contrast, very little is known about how the intracellular organelles such as mitochondria respond to matrix stiffness and whether their form, function, and localization change accordingly. Here, we performed an extensive quantitative characterization of mitochondrial morphology, subcellular localization, dynamics, and membrane tension on soft and stiff matrices...
May 17, 2024: Molecular Biology of the Cell
https://read.qxmd.com/read/38758654/gtpase-activity-regulates-ftsz-ring-positioning-in-caulobacter-crescentus
#15
JOURNAL ARTICLE
Jordan M Barrows, Barbara K Talavera-Figueroa, Isaac P Payne, Erika L Smith, Erin D Goley
Bacterial cell division is crucial for replication and requires careful coordination via proteins collectively called the divisome. The tubulin-like GTPase FtsZ is the master regulator of this process and serves to recruit downstream divisome proteins and regulate their activities. Upon assembling at mid-cell, FtsZ exhibits treadmilling motion driven by GTP binding and hydrolysis. Treadmilling is proposed to play roles in Z-ring condensation and in distribution and regulation of peptidoglycan (PG) cell wall enzymes...
May 17, 2024: Molecular Biology of the Cell
https://read.qxmd.com/read/38717453/cell-type-and-transcription-independent-spatial-proximity-between-enhancers-and-promoters
#16
JOURNAL ARTICLE
Yasmine Mian, Li Wang, Adib Keikhosravi, Konnie Guo, Tom Misteli, H Efsun Arda, Elizabeth H Finn
Cell type-specific enhancers are critically important for lineage specification. The mechanisms that determine cell type-specificity of enhancer activity, however, are not fully understood. Most current models for how enhancers function invoke physical proximity between enhancer elements and their target genes. Here, we use an imaging-based approach to examine the spatial relationship of cell type-specific enhancers and their target genes with single cell resolution. Using high-throughput microscopy, we measure the spatial distance from target promoters to their cell type-specific active and inactive enhancers in individual pancreatic cells derived from distinct lineages...
May 8, 2024: Molecular Biology of the Cell
https://read.qxmd.com/read/38717434/time-resolved-cryogenic-electron-tomography-for-the-study-of-transient-cellular-processes
#17
JOURNAL ARTICLE
Joseph Yoniles, Jacob A Summers, Kara A Zielinski, Cali Antolini, Mayura Panjalingam, Stella Lisova, Frank R Moss, Maximus Aldo Di Perna, Christopher Kupitz, Mark S Hunter, Lois Pollack, Soichi Wakatsuki, Peter D Dahlberg
Cryogenic electron tomography (cryo-ET) is the highest resolution imaging technique applicable to the life sciences, enabling sub-nanometer visualization of specimens preserved in their near native states. The rapid plunge freezing process used to prepare samples lends itself to time-resolved studies, which researchers have pursued for in vitro samples for decades. Here, we focus on developing a freezing apparatus for time-resolved studies in situ . The device mixes cellular samples with solution-phase stimulants before spraying them directly onto an electron microscopy grid that is transiting into cryogenic liquid ethane...
May 8, 2024: Molecular Biology of the Cell
https://read.qxmd.com/read/38696262/the-methylome-of-motile-cilia
#18
JOURNAL ARTICLE
Stephen M King, Miho Sakato-Antoku, Ramila S Patel-King, Jeremy L Balsbaugh
Cilia are highly complex motile, sensory, and secretory organelles that contain perhaps 1,000 or more distinct protein components, many of which are subject to various post-translational modifications such as phosphorylation, N-terminal acetylation, and proteolytic processing. Another common modification is the addition of one or more methyl groups to the side chains of arginine and lysine residues. These tunable additions delocalize the side-chain charge, decrease hydrogen bond capacity, and increase both bulk and hydrophobicity...
May 2, 2024: Molecular Biology of the Cell
https://read.qxmd.com/read/38696259/verteporfin-inhibits-tgf-%C3%AE-signaling-by-disrupting-the-smad2-3-smad4-interaction
#19
JOURNAL ARTICLE
Junxiu Nong, Shengqiang Shen, Fan Hong, Fan Xiao, Lingtian Meng, Pilong Li, Xiaoguang Lei, Ye-Guang Chen
Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) signaling plays a crucial role in pathogenesis, such as accelerating tissue fibrosis and promoting tumor development at the later stages of tumorigenesis by promoting epithelial-mesenchymal transition, cancer cell migration, and invasion. Targeting TGF-β signaling is a promising therapeutic approach, but non-specific inhibition may result in adverse effects. In this study, we focus on the Smad2/3-Smad4 complex, a key component in TGF-β signaling transduction, as a potential target for cancer therapy...
May 2, 2024: Molecular Biology of the Cell
https://read.qxmd.com/read/38696256/-drosophila-nhe2-over-expression-induces-autophagic-cell-death
#20
JOURNAL ARTICLE
Jobelle Peralta, Blake DuPriest, Daniel Orozco, Juan Reyna Pacheco, Laura Martins, Rachel Ann Soriano, Alan Wong, Ramy Wong, Bree Grillo-Hill
Autophagy is a conserved catabolic process where double membrane-bound structures form around macromolecules or organelles targeted for degradation. Autophagosomes fuse with lysosomes to facilitate degradation and macromolecule recycling for homeostasis or growth in a cell autonomous fashion. In cancer cells, autophagy is often upregulated and helps cancer cells survive nutrient deprivation and stressful growth conditions. Here, we propose that the increased intracellular pH (pHi) common to cancer cells is sufficient to induce autophagic cell death...
May 2, 2024: Molecular Biology of the Cell
journal
journal
30926
1
2
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read
×

Save your favorite articles in one place with a free QxMD account.

×

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"

We want to hear from doctors like you!

Take a second to answer a survey question.