journal
Journals Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery...

Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Clinics of North America

https://read.qxmd.com/read/38782678/pediatric-cranial-vault-pathology
#1
REVIEW
Andrew D Linkugel, Erin E Anstadt, Jason Hauptman, Russell E Ettinger
A wide variety of diagnoses can be approached with a common framework for diagnosis, extirpation, and reconstruction of pediatric cranial vault pathologies. Durability of reconstruction is critical for the range of pediatric patients from infancy to adolescence. Rigid reconstruction, preferably with autologous tissue when possible, promotes brain protection and satisfactory aesthetic outcome. Careful planning can allow for immediate definitive reconstruction of defects without need for further surgical intervention...
May 22, 2024: Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Clinics of North America
https://read.qxmd.com/read/38777729/pediatric-odontogenic-infections
#2
REVIEW
Lindsey Teal, Barbara Sheller, Harlyn K Susarla
Odontogenic infections are a broad group of head and neck conditions that arise from the teeth and surrounding periodontium. These largely preventable infections disproportionately affect members of ethnic and racial minorities and low-income/uninsured groups, and result in significant costs to our health care system. Left untreated, odontogenic infections can spread to deep spaces of the head and neck and can result in life-threatening complications. The mainstay of treatment includes timely treatment of the affected teeth...
May 21, 2024: Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Clinics of North America
https://read.qxmd.com/read/38777728/head-and-neck-malignancies-in-children
#3
REVIEW
Joseph Lopez, Anthony P Tufaro
Since 2000, the incidence of head and neck cancer has dramatically increased. At this time, future studies are needed to further elucidate the factors contributing to rising incidence of head and neck cancer in children. This article provides a treatment framework for the pediatric surgical oncologist who manages cancer in children.
May 21, 2024: Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Clinics of North America
https://read.qxmd.com/read/38760199/pediatric-craniomaxillofacial-pathology
#4
EDITORIAL
Srinivas M Susarla
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
May 16, 2024: Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Clinics of North America
https://read.qxmd.com/read/38724424/facial-soft-tissue-lesions-in-children
#5
REVIEW
Christina M Beck, Tito Onyekweli, Russell E Ettinger, Markus D Boos
Facial soft tissue lesions in children are often classified based on their structure or cellular origin and can be benign or malignant. This review focuses on common facial soft tissue lesions in children, their clinical morphology, natural history, and medical and surgical management, with an emphasis on those considerations unique to soft tissue lesions present at this anatomic site.
May 8, 2024: Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Clinics of North America
https://read.qxmd.com/read/38724423/facial-nerve-pathology-in-children
#6
REVIEW
Natalie Derise, Craig Birgfeld, Patrick Byrne, G Nina Lu
Facial nerve pathology in children has devastating functional and psychosocial consequences. Facial palsy occurs less commonly in children than adults with a greater proportion caused by congenital causes. Most pediatric patients have normal life expectancy and few comorbidities and dynamic restoration of facial expression is prioritized. This article will focus on the unique aspects of care for facial palsy in the pediatric population.
May 8, 2024: Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Clinics of North America
https://read.qxmd.com/read/38724422/pediatric-salivary-gland-pathology
#7
REVIEW
Shaunak N Amin, Kristopher T Patterson, David J Cvancara, John P Dahl
Benign and malignant salivary gland disorders are uncommon in the pediatric population; however, these can be frequently seen in pediatric otolaryngology or oral and maxillofacial surgery practices. The astute clinician should be aware of the clinical presentation, diagnosis, and management options for common inflammatory, infectious, benign, and malignant disorders of salivary glands.
May 8, 2024: Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Clinics of North America
https://read.qxmd.com/read/38705817/conceptual-principles-in-pediatric-craniomaxillofacial-reconstruction
#8
REVIEW
Andrew D Linkugel, Michael Markiewicz, Sean Edwards, Srinivas M Susarla
Pediatric craniomaxillofacial reconstruction must be approached through the lens of growth and durability. A systematic approach of matching defects to donor tissue drives the selection of autologous donor material. The menu of available techniques for reconstruction can be organized in a ladder, similar to adults, with additional considerations. Reconstructive surgeons have the opportunity to promote and maintain young patients' sense of identity during their psychosocial development.
May 4, 2024: Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Clinics of North America
https://read.qxmd.com/read/38705816/craniomaxillofacial-fibro-osseous-lesions-in-children
#9
REVIEW
Andrea B Burke
Craniofacial fibro-osseous lesions represent a diverse spectrum of pathologic conditions where fibrous tissue replaces healthy bone, resulting in the formation of irregular, woven bone. They are more commonly diagnosed in young people, with treatment strategies dependent on clinical behavior and skeletal maturity. This article discusses the examples of craniofacial fibro-osseous lesions, based on the latest classifications, along with their diagnostic criteria and management.
May 4, 2024: Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Clinics of North America
https://read.qxmd.com/read/38632013/head-and-neck-vascular-anomalies-in-children
#10
REVIEW
Jeremy S Ruthberg, Srinivas M Susarla, Randall A Bly
Craniomaxillofacial vascular anomalies encompass a diverse and complex set of pathologies that may have a profound impact on pediatric patients. They are subdivided into vascular tumors and vascular malformations depending on biological properties, clinical course, and distribution patterns. Given the complexity and potential for leading to significant functional morbidity and esthetic concerns, a multidisciplinary approach is generally necessary to optimize patient outcomes. This article reviews the etiology, clinical course, diagnosis, and current management practices related to vascular anomalies in the head and neck...
April 16, 2024: Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Clinics of North America
https://read.qxmd.com/read/38458858/gender-affirming-facial-surgery-anatomy-and-procedures-for-facial-masculinization
#11
REVIEW
Arya Andre Akhavan, John Henry Pang, Shane D Morrison, Thomas Satterwhite
For some patients, feminine facial features may cause significant gender dysphoria. Multiple nonsurgical and surgical techniques exist to masculinize facial features. Nonsurgical techniques include testosterone supplementation and dermal fillers. Surgical techniques include soft tissue manipulation, synthetic implants, regenerative scaffolding, or bony reconstruction. Many techniques are derived from experience with cisgender patients, but are adapted with special considerations to differing anatomy between cisgender and transgender men and women...
May 2024: Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Clinics of North America
https://read.qxmd.com/read/38402141/facial-feminization-upper-third-of-the-face
#12
REVIEW
Elie P Ramly, Coral Katave, Kavitha Ranganathan
Facial feminization surgery (FFS) is a crucial intervention for transgender women. This article delves into comprehensive reconstruction of the upper third of the face, discussing anatomic differences between masculine and feminine features, and surgical considerations. Technical considerations, preoperative planning, procedural approaches, and postoperative care are described in detail. Patient-centered operative planning and execution ensure safety and efficacy in FFS and uphold its transformative effect on quality of life in appropriately selected surgical candidates...
May 2024: Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Clinics of North America
https://read.qxmd.com/read/38310029/preoperative-radiology-and-virtual-surgical-planning
#13
REVIEW
Brendan J Cronin, Justine C Lee
Virtual surgical planning enables precise surgical planning and translation of this planning into the operating room. Preoperative maxillofacial computed tomography scans are compared to a reference skull to identify desired surgical changes. In facial feminization surgery, these include forehead recontouring/frontal table setback, gonial angle reduction, and possible chin repositioning/reshaping, while in facial masculinization surgery, this includes forehead augmentation and gonial angle/chin augmentation...
May 2024: Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Clinics of North America
https://read.qxmd.com/read/38522979/pediatric-orbital-and-skull-base-pathology
#14
REVIEW
Dominic Nistal, Amy Lee, Jacob Ruzevick
Pediatric orbital and skull base pathologies encompass a spectrum of inflammatory, sporadic, syndromic, and neoplastic processes that require a broad and complex clinical approach for both medical and surgical treatment. Given their complexity and often multicompartment involvement, a multidisciplinary approach for diagnosis, patient and family counseling, and ultimately treatment provides the best patient satisfaction and clinical outcomes. Advances in minimally invasive surgical approaches, including endoscopic endonasal and transorbital approaches allows for more targeted surgical approaches through smaller corridors beyond more classic transcranial or transracial approaches...
March 23, 2024: Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Clinics of North America
https://read.qxmd.com/read/38462396/pediatric-odontogenic-cysts-and-tumors
#15
REVIEW
Sarah Loren Moles, Caitlin B L Magraw
Pediatric odontogenic cysts and tumors are rare and often associated with developing or impacted teeth. Odontogenic cysts are broadly categorized as inflammatory or developmental while odontogenic tumors are classified histologically as epithelial, mesenchymal, or mixed tumors. This article will discuss the presentation, diagnosis, and treatment of odontogenic cysts and tumors in the pediatric population.
March 9, 2024: Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Clinics of North America
https://read.qxmd.com/read/38462395/pediatric-temporomandibular-joint-pathology
#16
REVIEW
Cory M Resnick
Pediatric temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorders represent a broad range of congenital and acquired diagnoses. Dentofacial deformities, including facial asymmetry, retrognathism, and malocclusion, commonly develop. Compared with adult TMJ conditions, pain and articular disc pathology are less common. Accurate diagnosis is paramount in planning and prognostication. Several specific considerations apply in preparation for skeletal correction, including timing in relation to disease progression and growth trajectory, expectation for postcorrection stability, reconstructive technique as it applies to expected durability and need for future revision, management of occlusion, and need for ancillary procedures to optimize correction...
March 9, 2024: Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Clinics of North America
https://read.qxmd.com/read/38458857/gender-affirming-facial-surgery
#17
EDITORIAL
Russell E Ettinger
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
March 7, 2024: Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Clinics of North America
https://read.qxmd.com/read/38402140/facial-gender-affirming-surgery-pitfalls-complications-and-how-to-avoid-them
#18
REVIEW
Jacquelyn Knox, William Y Hoffman
Facial feminization is a complex undertaking requiring skill in both craniofacial and aesthetic plastic surgery. As in aesthetic procedures, understanding the patient's goals and setting realistic expectations in light of an individual's anatomy is critical. Both soft tissue and bone must be addressed to adequately soften masculine facial features. This article delves into specific anatomic areas and delineates some of the pathways to successful outcomes.
February 23, 2024: Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Clinics of North America
https://read.qxmd.com/read/38402139/benign-non-odontogenic-pathology
#19
REVIEW
Aparna Bhat, Ryan Smart, Mark Egbert, Srinivas Susarla
This article provides a comprehensive overview of benign non-odontogenic pathologies. Bone-derived lesions like osteoma, osteoid osteoma, osteoblastoma, and osteochondroma are discussed in detail, emphasizing their radiographic features, locations, and treatment strategies. Cartilage-derived lesions such as chondroma, chondroblastoma, and chondromyxoid fibroma are also examined, noting their typical presentation and management approaches. The article then delves into fibroconnective tissue lesions. Mesenchymal and vascular lesions are detailed regarding their clinical and radiographic characteristics and treatment options...
February 23, 2024: Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Clinics of North America
https://read.qxmd.com/read/38395668/benign-intraoral-soft-tissue-lesions-in-children
#20
REVIEW
Ashley E Manlove, Erik N Quintana, Leticia M Cuellar, Alexis M Linnebur
Benign intraoral soft tissue pathology in pediatric patients includes developmental, traumatic, inflammatory, and infectious lesions. Common pathology includes gingival cysts, mucoceles, fibromas, and parulis. Less common lesions include peripheral ossifying fibromas, congenital epulis of the newborn, and congenital mandibular duct atresia. Most of these lesions present at painless masses but can have significant effects on children and their caregivers. Although these lesions are generally harmless, evaluation and treatment is necessary for appropriate management and health of the child...
February 22, 2024: Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Clinics of North America
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