journal
https://read.qxmd.com/read/37010928/community-health-worker-integration-with-and-effectiveness-in-health-care-and-public-health-in-the-united-states
#1
REVIEW
Molly Knowles, Aidan P Crowley, Aditi Vasan, Shreya Kangovi
Community health workers (CHWs) have worked in a variety of settings in the United States for more than 70 years and are increasingly recognized as an essential health workforce. CHWs share life experience with the people they serve and have firsthand knowledge of the causes and impacts of health inequity. They provide a critical link between marginalized communities and health care and public health services. Several studies have demonstrated that CHWs can improve the management of chronic conditions, increase access to preventive care, improve patients' experience of care, and reduce health care costs...
April 3, 2023: Annual Review of Public Health
https://read.qxmd.com/read/37010927/on-the-go-adaptation-of-implementation-approaches-and-strategies-in-health-emerging-perspectives-and-research-opportunities
#2
REVIEW
Elvin H Geng, Aaloke Mody, Byron J Powell
In many cases, implementation approaches (composed of one or more strategies) may need to change over time to work optimally. We use a literature review to inform a mechanistic analysis of such on-the-go adaptations. We suggest that such adaptations of implementation strategies consist of three necessary steps. The first component is the initial effect of the implementation approach on intended implementation, service delivery, or clinical outcomes. Second, these initial effects must in turn be used to modify, alter, intensify, or otherwise change the implementation approach...
April 3, 2023: Annual Review of Public Health
https://read.qxmd.com/read/37010926/the-urgency-of-addressing-climate-change
#3
JOURNAL ARTICLE
Jonathan E Fielding, Ross C Brownson, Lawrence W Green
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
April 3, 2023: Annual Review of Public Health
https://read.qxmd.com/read/37010925/promoting-health-equity-through-preventing-or-mitigating-the-effects-of-gentrification-a-theoretical-and-methodological-guide
#4
REVIEW
Helen V S Cole, Isabelle Anguelovski, Margarita Triguero-Mas, Roshanak Mehdipanah, Mariana Arcaya
Public health researchers are increasingly questioning the consequences of gentrification for population health and health equity, as witnessed in the rapid increase in public health publications on the health (equity) effects of gentrification. Despite methodological challenges, and mixed results from existing quantitative research, qualitative evidence to date points to the role of gentrification processes in exacerbating health inequities. Here we discuss past methodological and theoretical challenges in integrating the study of gentrification with public health research...
April 3, 2023: Annual Review of Public Health
https://read.qxmd.com/read/36626834/innovations-in-public-health-surveillance-for-emerging-infections
#5
REVIEW
Peng Jia, Shiyong Liu, Shujuan Yang
Public health surveillance is defined as the ongoing, systematic collection, analysis, and interpretation of health data and is closely integrated with the timely dissemination of information that the public needs to know and upon which the public should act. Public health surveillance is central to modern public health practice by contributing data and information usually through a national notifiable disease reporting system (NNDRS). Although early identification and prediction of future disease trends may be technically feasible, more work is needed to improve accuracy so that policy makers can use these predictions to guide prevention and control efforts...
April 3, 2023: Annual Review of Public Health
https://read.qxmd.com/read/36542770/public-health-and-prisons-priorities-in-the-age-of-mass-incarceration
#6
REVIEW
David H Cloud, Ilana R Garcia-Grossman, Andrea Armstrong, Brie Williams
Mass incarceration is a sociostructural driver of profound health inequalities in the United States. The political and economic forces underpinning mass incarceration are deeply rooted in centuries of the enslavement of people of African descent and the genocide and displacement of Indigenous people and is inextricably connected to labor exploitation, racial discrimination, the criminalization of immigration, and behavioral health problems such as mental illness and substance use disorders. This article focuses on major public health crises and advances in state and federal prisons and discusses a range of practical strategies for health scholars, practitioners, and activists to promote the health and dignity of incarcerated people...
April 3, 2023: Annual Review of Public Health
https://read.qxmd.com/read/36692395/the-state-of-the-us-public-health-workforce-ongoing-challenges-and-future-directions
#7
REVIEW
Jonathon P Leider, Valerie A Yeager, Chelsey Kirkland, Heather Krasna, Rachel Hare Bork, Beth Resnick
Between the 2009 Great Recession and the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic, the US state and local governmental public health workforce lost 40,000 jobs. Tens of thousands of workers also left during the pandemic and continue to leave. As governmental health departments are now receiving multimillion-dollar, temporary federal investments to replenish their workforce, this review synthesizes the evidence regarding major challenges that preceded the pandemic and remain now. These include the lack of the field's ability to readily enumerate and define the governmental public health workforce as well as challenges with the recruitment and retention of public health workers...
January 24, 2023: Annual Review of Public Health
https://read.qxmd.com/read/36542773/climatic-and-environmental-change-migration-and-health
#8
REVIEW
Celia McMichael
The impacts of climate change, such as sea-level rise and extreme weather events, are expected to increase and alter human migration and mobility. Climate-related mobility is not inherently a crisis; it can provide a pathway for adaptation to climate change. However, a growing body of research identifies health risks and some opportunities associated with climate-related mobility. This review examines recent research (published since 2018) on the climate change-mobility-health nexus; this research focuses largely on in-country mobility in Asia, Africa, and Pacific Island countries...
December 21, 2022: Annual Review of Public Health
https://read.qxmd.com/read/36542772/leveraging-mobile-technology-for-public-health-promotion-a-multidisciplinary-perspective
#9
REVIEW
Jennifer L Hicks, Melissa A Boswell, Tim Althoff, Alia J Crum, Joy P Ku, James A Landay, Paula M L Moya, Elizabeth L Murnane, Michael P Snyder, Abby C King, Scott L Delp
Health behaviors are inextricably linked to health and well-being, yet issues such as physical inactivity and insufficient sleep remain significant global public health problems. Mobile technology-and the unprecedented scope and quantity of data it generates-has a promising but largely untapped potential to promote health behaviors at the individual and population levels. This perspective article provides multidisciplinary recommendations on the design and use of mobile technology, and the concomitant wealth of data, to promote behaviors that support overall health...
December 21, 2022: Annual Review of Public Health
https://read.qxmd.com/read/36542771/a-literature-review-of-the-effects-of-air-pollution-on-covid-19-health-outcomes-worldwide-statistical-challenges-and-data-visualization
#10
REVIEW
A Bhaskar, J Chandra, H Hashemi, K Butler, L Bennett, Jacqueline Cellini, Danielle Braun, Francesca Dominici
Several peer-reviewed papers and reviews have examined the relationship between exposure to air pollution and COVID-19 spread and severity. However, many of the existing reviews on this topic do not extensively present the statistical challenges associated with this field, do not provide comprehensive guidelines for future researchers, and review only the results of a relatively small number of papers. We reviewed 139 papers, 127 of which reported a statistically significant positive association between air pollution and adverse COVID-19 health outcomes...
December 21, 2022: Annual Review of Public Health
https://read.qxmd.com/read/36525960/multilevel-determinants-of-digital-health-equity-a-literature-synthesis-to-advance-the-field
#11
REVIEW
Courtney R Lyles, Oanh Kieu Nguyen, Elaine C Khoong, Adrian Aguilera, Urmimala Sarkar
Current digital health approaches have not engaged diverse end users or reduced health or health care inequities, despite their promise to deliver more tailored and personalized support to individuals at the right time and the right place. To achieve digital health equity, we must refocus our attention on the current state of digital health uptake and use across the policy, system, community, individual, and intervention levels. We focus here on ( a ) outlining a multilevel framework underlying digital health equity; ( b ) summarizing five types of interventions/programs (with example studies) that hold promise for advancing digital health equity; and ( c ) recommending future steps for improving policy, practice, and research in this space...
December 16, 2022: Annual Review of Public Health
https://read.qxmd.com/read/36525959/enhancing-capacity-for-food-and-nutrient-intake-assessment-in-population-sciences-research
#12
REVIEW
Marian L Neuhouser, Ross L Prentice, Lesley F Tinker, Johanna W Lampe
Nutrition influences health throughout the life course. Good nutrition increases the probability of good pregnancy outcomes, proper childhood development, and healthy aging, and it lowers the probability of developing common diet-related chronic diseases, including obesity, cardiovascular disease, cancer, and type 2 diabetes. Despite the importance of diet and health, studying these exposures is among the most challenging in population sciences research. US and global food supplies are complex; eating patterns have shifted such that half of meals are eaten away from home, and there are thousands of food ingredients with myriad combinations...
December 16, 2022: Annual Review of Public Health
https://read.qxmd.com/read/36525958/review-of-the-impact-of-housing-quality-on-inequalities-in-health-and-well-being
#13
REVIEW
Philippa Howden-Chapman, Julie Bennett, Richard Edwards, David Jacobs, Kim Nathan, David Ormandy
Housing quality is essential for population health and broader well-being. The World Health Organization housing and health guidelines highlight interventions that protect occupants from cold and hot temperatures, injuries, and other hazards. The COVID-19 pandemic has emphasized the importance of ventilation standards. Housing standards are unevenly developed, implemented, and monitored globally, despite robust research demonstrating that retrofitting existing houses and constructing high-quality new ones can reduce respiratory, cardiovascular, and infectious diseases...
December 16, 2022: Annual Review of Public Health
https://read.qxmd.com/read/36525957/when-moving-is-the-only-option-the-role-of-necessity-versus-choice-for-understanding-and-promoting-physical-activity-in-low-and-middle-income-countries
#14
REVIEW
Deborah Salvo, Alejandra J√°uregui, Deepti Adlakha, Olga L Sarmiento, Rodrigo S Reis
Given its origins in high-income countries, the field of physical activity and public health research and promotion has broadly followed a choice-based model. However, a substantial amount of the physical activity occurring routinely in many settings, particularly in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs), is the result of economic necessity and is not due to true, free choices. We propose the "necessity- versus choice-based physical activity models" framework as a conceptual tool to ground physical activity and public health research and promotion efforts in LMICs, helping ensure that these efforts are relevant, ethical, responsive, and respectful to local contexts...
December 16, 2022: Annual Review of Public Health
https://read.qxmd.com/read/36516461/cancers-attributable-to-modifiable-risk-factors-a-road-map-for-prevention
#15
REVIEW
Giulia Collatuzzo, Paolo Boffetta
The implementation of primary and secondary preventive strategies is based on the evidence generated by cancer epidemiology, where the identification of risk factors and the description of their prevalence are fundamental to derive estimates on the burden of cancer from different etiologies, typically expressed as the population attributable fraction, which corresponds to the proportion of a cancer that may be prevented by controlling a given risk factor. However, even when cancer finds its etiology in modifiable factors, its prevention through the control of those factors is not always feasible, or it remains suboptimal despite the possibility of reducing the burden...
December 14, 2022: Annual Review of Public Health
https://read.qxmd.com/read/36400154/using-rapid-randomized-trials-to-improve-health-care-systems
#16
REVIEW
Leora I Horwitz, Holly A Krelle
Rapid randomized controlled trials have been surprisingly rare in health care quality improvement (QI) and systems interventions. Applying clinical trials methodology QI work brings two distinct fields together, applying the robustness of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) to the practical, operational learnings of the well-established QI field. Rapid trials also add a third element-speed-that enables health care systems to rapidly test multiple variations of an intervention in much the same way that A/B testing is done in the technology sector...
November 18, 2022: Annual Review of Public Health
https://read.qxmd.com/read/36332659/the-impacts-of-paid-family-and-medical-leave-on-worker-health-family-well-being-and-employer-outcomes
#17
REVIEW
Ann Bartel, Maya Rossin-Slater, Christopher Ruhm, Meredith Slopen, Jane Waldfogel
This article reviews the evidence on the impacts of paid family and medical leave (PFML) policies on workers' health, family well-being, and employer outcomes. While an extensive body of research demonstrates the mostly beneficial effects of PFML taken by new parents on infant, child, and parental health, less is known about its impact on employees who need leave to care for older children, adult family members, or elderly relatives. The evidence on employers is similarly limited but indicates that PFML does not impose major burdens on them...
November 4, 2022: Annual Review of Public Health
https://read.qxmd.com/read/36332658/early-childhood-education-health-equity-and-economics
#18
REVIEW
Robert A Hahn, W Steven Barnett
Many low-income and minority children in the United States and globally are at risk of poor educational trajectories and, consequently, diminished life courses, because their households and neighborhoods lack resources to adequately support learning and development prior to formal schooling. This review summarizes evidence on center-based early childhood education (ECE) for three- and four-year-olds as a means of assuring school readiness in cognitive and socioemotional skills. While the details of ECE programs merit further research, it is clear that ECE can benefit children, especially those most disadvantaged, with additional societal benefits and positive long-run economic returns...
November 4, 2022: Annual Review of Public Health
https://read.qxmd.com/read/36266262/the-value-and-impacts-of-academic-public-health-departments
#19
REVIEW
Paul C Erwin, Julie H Grubaugh, Stephanie Mazzucca-Ragan, Ross C Brownson
The academic health department (AHD) is a partnership between an academic institution and a governmental health agency. These partnerships are meant to provide mutual benefits that include opportunities for student field placements and internships, practice-informed curriculum, and practice-based research. The term academic health department dates back only to 2000, although there are several examples of academic-practice partnerships prior to that date. In addition to AHDs that have been established over the past two decades, other forms of academic-practice engagement provide similar mutual benefits, such as prevention research centers and public health training centers...
October 20, 2022: Annual Review of Public Health
https://read.qxmd.com/read/36207008/health-misinformation-exposure-and-health-disparities-observations-and-opportunities
#20
REVIEW
Brian G Southwell, Jessica Otero Machuca, Sabrina T Cherry, Melissa Burnside, Nadine J Barrett
The concepts of health misinformation and health disparities have been prominent in public health literature in recent years, in part because of the threat that each notion poses to public health. How exactly are misinformation proliferation and health disparities related, however? What roles might misinformation play in explaining the health disparities that we have documented in the United States and elsewhere? How might we mitigate the effects of misinformation exposure among people facing relatively poor health outcomes? In this review, we address such questions by first defining health disparities and misinformation as concepts and then considering how misinformation exposure might theoretically affect health decision-making and account for disparate health behavior and health outcomes...
October 7, 2022: Annual Review of Public Health
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