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Cutis; Cutaneous Medicine for the Practitioner

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https://read.qxmd.com/read/30758350/locally-destructive-metastatic-basal-cell-carcinoma
#1
Erica Tillman, Palak Kishorkumar Parekh, Ronald Eugene Grimwood
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
January 2019: Cutis; Cutaneous Medicine for the Practitioner
https://read.qxmd.com/read/30758349/multicentric-reticulohistiocytosis-with-arthralgia-and-red-orange-papulonodules
#2
Loren Franco, Kristen Miller, Rishi R Patel, Sandra J Bost, Sarika M Ramachandran
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
January 2019: Cutis; Cutaneous Medicine for the Practitioner
https://read.qxmd.com/read/30758348/paraneoplastic-dermatomyositis-presenting-with-interesting-cutaneous-findings
#3
Zachary Goldstein, Jamie Zussman, Scott Worswick
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
January 2019: Cutis; Cutaneous Medicine for the Practitioner
https://read.qxmd.com/read/30758347/acute-kwashiorkor-in-the-setting-of-cerebral-palsy-and-pancreatic-insufficiency
#4
Rachel R Marks, Jessica Rae Burgy, Loretta S Davis
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
January 2019: Cutis; Cutaneous Medicine for the Practitioner
https://read.qxmd.com/read/30758346/annular-elastolytic-giant-cell-granuloma-mysterious-enlarging-scarring-lesions
#5
Sabrina R Szabo, Colby Fernelius, Navin Arora
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
January 2019: Cutis; Cutaneous Medicine for the Practitioner
https://read.qxmd.com/read/30758345/emerging-roles-of-social-media-in-dermatology
#6
Julie Ann Amthor Croley
The rise of social media in dermatology provides dermatologists novel academic, business, and personal growth opportunities. Unique challenges include blind authorship, lack of source citation, and presentation of opinion as fact.
January 2019: Cutis; Cutaneous Medicine for the Practitioner
https://read.qxmd.com/read/30758344/white-concretions-on-the-hair-shaft
#7
Melinda Liu, Alex G Ortega-Loayza
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
January 2019: Cutis; Cutaneous Medicine for the Practitioner
https://read.qxmd.com/read/30758343/small-white-spots-on-the-lips
#8
Peggy Rachel Cyr, Leigh Pemberton Johnson
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
January 2019: Cutis; Cutaneous Medicine for the Practitioner
https://read.qxmd.com/read/30758342/erythematous-periumbilical-papules-and-plaques
#9
Ryan Karmouta, Anar Mikailov
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
January 2019: Cutis; Cutaneous Medicine for the Practitioner
https://read.qxmd.com/read/30758341/what-s-eating-you-bedbugs
#10
Jay Chittoor, Bart D Wilkison, Brandon W McNally
Bedbugs are a known household scourge that also have become an increasing problem in the corporate space. These pests have adapted to the office environment, finding new harborages in which to thrive and devising new ways to obtain blood meals during the day. Bedbugs pose a considerable public health problem, and managing the epidemic will require vigilance by health care professionals as well as patient education on prevention. We present the case of a 42-year-old man with treatment-refractory pruritic papules over the bilateral posterior arms that were attributed to a bedbug infestation at his workplace...
January 2019: Cutis; Cutaneous Medicine for the Practitioner
https://read.qxmd.com/read/30758340/pediatric-warts-update-on-interventions
#11
Nanette B Silverberg
Warts are superficial viral infections of the skin that are extremely common in children. The infection usually lasts more than 1 year and can be moderately contagious in specific settings; for instance, warts are particularly common and spread more easily in the setting of atopic dermatitis, a chronic, itchy pediatric skin condition caused by barrier and immune defects. Therapies for pediatric warts are characterized according to 6 major categories: destructive; immune stimulating; immune modulating, including normalization of epithelial growth; vascular destructive; irritant; and nitric oxide releasing...
January 2019: Cutis; Cutaneous Medicine for the Practitioner
https://read.qxmd.com/read/30758339/combat-dermatology-the-role-of-the-deployed-army-dermatologist
#12
Timothy A Durso, Bart O Iddins, Nathanial R Miletta
Shortly after completing residency or fellowship, army dermatologists routinely deploy to combat zones as field surgeons. The US Army generally does not deploy dermatologists for their expertise in diagnosing and managing cutaneous diseases; rather, as field surgeons they provide routine, emergency, and trauma care for active-duty soldiers and coalition forces. In this article, we review the various functions of the deployed dermatologist and highlight the importance of maintaining basic emergency medical skills that could be generalized to the civilian population in case of local or national emergencies...
January 2019: Cutis; Cutaneous Medicine for the Practitioner
https://read.qxmd.com/read/30758338/solitary-nodule-on-the-thigh
#13
Qiong Wu, Daniel C Skipper, Dirk M Elston, Jessica A Forucci
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
January 2019: Cutis; Cutaneous Medicine for the Practitioner
https://read.qxmd.com/read/30758337/nonhealing-eroded-plaque-on-an-interdigital-web-space-of-the-foot
#14
Thomas Stasko, Jarad Levin, Ngoc Nguyen, Nancy Dawson, A Neil Crowson
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
January 2019: Cutis; Cutaneous Medicine for the Practitioner
https://read.qxmd.com/read/30758336/digital-revolution-dermatology-is-on-the-edge
#15
Vincent A DeLeo
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
January 2019: Cutis; Cutaneous Medicine for the Practitioner
https://read.qxmd.com/read/30758335/pityriasis-amiantacea-following-bone-marrow-transplant
#16
Omar Bari, Phillip R Cohen
Pityriasis amiantacea (PA) is a hair disorder characterized by matting of multiple hair shafts, typically occurring as an idiopathic condition. A 67-year-old woman with multiple myeloma who developed PA following a bone marrow transplant with melphalan conditioning is described.She noted initial changes in scalp hair regrowth 4 weeks posttransplant. During the next 4 months she developed multiple lesions of PA that rapidly responded to management, including mineral oil under occlusion in the evening followed by daily shampooing with alternating coal tar, salicylic acid, and ketoconazole shampoos...
January 2019: Cutis; Cutaneous Medicine for the Practitioner
https://read.qxmd.com/read/30758334/idiopathic-granulomatous-mastitis
#17
Karyn Haitz, Amy Ly, Gideon Smith
Idiopathic granulomatous mastitis (IGM) is a rare, poorly understood condition that presents as inflammatory nodules of the breast. It is often initially misdiagnosed as furunculosis or cellulitis. Despite the painful, scarring, and debilitating nature of the disease, patients often have a delay in accurate diagnosis and treatment. Even when IGM is considered as a diagnosis, it is one of exclusion, with the differential diagnosis including serious conditions such as breast cancer, sarcoidosis, and cutaneous tuberculosis...
January 2019: Cutis; Cutaneous Medicine for the Practitioner
https://read.qxmd.com/read/30758333/en-coup-de-sabre
#18
Paul M Graham, Naeha Gupta, David A Altman
En coup de sabre (ECDS) is a rare form of localized scleroderma that typically manifests in children and women. It presents as a fibrous pansclerotic plaque extending in a bandlike distribution on the frontoparietal scalp with surrounding scarring alopecia. Many patients have comorbid central nervous system involvement in addition to the cutaneous findings. En coup de sabre is a rare entity that should be delineated from Parry-Romberg syndrome, as both entities share some common features and may coexist. Corticosteroids remain the treatment of choice, but other modalities such as methotrexate, excimer laser, and grafting have been used with varying success...
January 2019: Cutis; Cutaneous Medicine for the Practitioner
https://read.qxmd.com/read/30758332/necrobiosis-lipoidica-with-superimposed-pyoderma-vegetans
#19
Carl J Barrick, Omobola Onikoyi, Nektarios I Lountzis, Tanya Ermolovich, Stephen M Purcell
Necrobiosis lipoidica (NL) is a granulomatous inflammatory skin disease strongly associated with diabetes mellitus (DM). Red-brown papules expanding into plaques with erythematous indurated borders on the lower extremities are characteristic of NL. Diagnosis is made clinically; however, biopsy of lesions confirms the diagnosis. Untreated NL may ulcerate and lead to further complications, but progression to superimposed pyoderma vegetans (PV) is not a known occurrence.
January 2019: Cutis; Cutaneous Medicine for the Practitioner
https://read.qxmd.com/read/30657811/lipoblastoma-of-the-scalp-in-a-child
#20
Jill S Wallace, Nicole C Pace
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
December 2018: Cutis; Cutaneous Medicine for the Practitioner
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